HoopsHype Seattle rumors

July 24, 2011 Updates

"I can still create off the dribble," Roy warned. "I still think you are crazy to put a guy who can't guard on me. You'll get exposed all night. So I don't want to get away from that. "But I have to get in a position again where the team believes enough in me to make me a threat," Roy said. "I don't have to be The Guy, but just a focal point again, to where -- not to knock a player -- but if Jason Terry is guarding me, then my team can believe I can expose that matchup. That's part of getting my confidence back to where I can give confidence back to Coach and the organization." Oregonian

July 21, 2011 Updates
July 19, 2011 Updates
February 26, 2011 Updates
February 15, 2011 Updates

Cities that have expressed interest in taking on an existing NBA team in a franchise relocation "I think maybe or maybe not on my watch, when Seattle has plans for a new building, I think it's a very prime city for an NBA franchise. We've been visited or contacted by three different groups that are putting up a building in Las Vegas. & We've had visits from Anaheim, we've had visits from, believe it or not, Vancouver." Cities that have NBA-ready buildings "Well, for sure Kansas City. ... There's a brand new building in Pittsburgh, there's a good building in St. Louis, there's a good building in Tampa/St. Pete. ... I know [Anaheim's Honda Center has] got some years on it but I'm told it's a serviceable building. ESPN.com

January 6, 2011 Updates

The NBA might be gone from Lower Queen Anne, but one former Sonic is back. Shawn Kemp and his wife, Marvena, opened Oskar's Kitchen last month at 621 1/2 Queen Anne Ave. N. across from the MarQueen Hotel last month. The restaurant, in the space formerly occupied by Acadia Bistro, features the Bubble Room lounge with a large fish tank housing the spot's namesake – Oskar the fish. Seattle Post-Intelligencer

December 12, 2010 Updates

In other words, Seattle still doesn’t have its act together, so to put a team there, Stern would have to fight many of the same battles he did five years ago. If the city doesn’t get some political backing for a new venue, it could be behind Kansas City, Anaheim, and San Jose in the relocation line. Stern assigned New Orleans native Jac Sperling to oversee the Hornets franchise and attempt to find a local buyer. The commissioner realizes that is not going to be easy, especially with out-of-town owners dangling money at the nomad organization. Boston Globe

December 10, 2010 Updates

What's more, there isn't an available market that makes relocation sense, I'm informed. Seattle would be the clear-cut favorite, says a source, but the Sonics' old home (Key Arena) still needs a major facelift to meet NBA high-tech design or another space needs to be carved out in a hurry. Thirdly, the 29 owners who paid George Shinn $300 million and must now subsidize the Hornets at $45-to-50 million in perpetuity figure to be reluctant to do so beyond next season. In fact, logic dictates they're probably leaning toward ending the funding after this one, depending on how negotiations turn out regarding a new Collective Bargaining Agreement. New York Post

December 8, 2010 Updates

#1 – Seattle, WA – If Charlotte was rewarded with a franchise after the Hornets left, then certainly Seattle deserves a second chance at an NBA team with the way things left off after the Sonics left in 2008. It's the 23rd-largest American city with a population of well over 600,000 people, and it's already got an established fan base as well as two other professional franchises in the Mariners and Seahawks. As long as the city could get their arena issues figured out, there's no more logical place to send an NBA franchise than the Emerald City. On top of everything, Seattle retained the rights to the Sonics name when Durant and Co. headed down to OKC. That means we'd get the Seattle SuperSonics back, and what scenario could possibly be more ideal than that? HoopsWorld

December 6, 2010 Updates

Kansas City, Anaheim and Seattle have been mentioned as possible relocation sites, in addition to Chicago, which already has the Bulls, but it is the country’s third-largest media market and could conceivably support two teams. Hornets Coach Monty Williams said before Sunday night’s game in San Antonio that he’d addressed the situation with the team, and that players asked several questions which he answered as best he could. New Orleans Times-Picayune

August 26, 2010 Updates

Dubbed "The Glove" for his ability to shut down opponents with his tough defense, Payton, 42, has now thrown his hat into other endeavors apart from basketball-related stuff. "Well, since retiring I have a lot of businesses. I own a lot of restaurants... I also do a lot of other things. I have a lot of Internet companies I deal with. I have shows on air (online) talking about basketball. I just picked up a show for football, so I’m gonna do some football and bring celebrities on..." Payton told BusinessWorld in an interview last Tuesday at the Dusit Thani Hotel in Makati City where the NBA legends are billeted. BusinessWorld Online Edition

"You know, I felt really bad [when the Seattle franchise folded in 2007]. So we’re hoping to get a franchise back there. A lot of NBA teams now want to relocate their clubs and hopefully they could consider Seattle. I’m going to do everything I can because I think the fans in Seattle deserve a basketball team there," said Payton, who partnered with Shawn Kemp to take the Sonics to the 1996 NBA Finals before losing to Michael Jordan’s Chicago Bulls. BusinessWorld Online Edition

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