HoopsHype Serbia rumors

November 12, 2011 Updates

Nikola Pekovic (210-C-86, agency: Beo Basket) and Acie Law (190-G-85, agency: Priority Sports, college: Texas A&M) will maybe get company from NBA in black and white jersey. The 28 year old Sasha Pavlovic (200-F-83) was seen tonight on Pionir stands. He came to watch the big Euroleague game against Real Madrid and Serbian journalists took the chance to interview him during the halftime break: I folow almost every game on TV and tonight I came to see live this important game for Partizan. Euroleague is a very strong competition this year and I would like to feel the taste of it. I work out individually every day. If the negotiations between the owners and the players representatives don't move in the right direction I will definitely sign a contract with a European team. Maybe even Partizan, who knows? I love the fans here... Eurobasket.com

September 21, 2011 Updates
September 13, 2011 Updates

Marc Stein: Morrison's deal does NOT contain an NBA out, so he's in Serbia for the season, determined to play and play a lot to work his way back to NBA Twitter

September 12, 2011 Updates
September 9, 2011 Updates
August 24, 2011 Updates
August 14, 2011 Updates

According to sources close to the situation, the deal between Partizan Belgrade and Nikola Pekovic is done. The big man from Montenegro will return to the Serbian powerhouse with a one-year contract with NBA out which will allow him to return to Minnesota Timberwolves when lockout ends. Sportando

August 12, 2011 Updates
July 30, 2011 Updates

Perennial Serbian and Adriatic League champion Partizan mt:s enhanced its backcourt for the upcoming Turkish Airlines Euroleague season by signing guard Acie Law to a one-year deal, the club announced Friday. Law (1.90 meters, 26 years old) arrives from Golden State of the NBA, where he averaged 5.1 points in 40 games last season. He started the season with Memphis. Law has played a total of 180 NBA games over four seasons with Atlanta, Golden State, Charlotte, Chicago and Memphis. Sportando

July 29, 2011 Updates

Free agent guard Acie Law is close to signing a deal with Partizan Belgrade of Serbia, one source told HoopsHype. The contract would be for one year and would not include an opt-out clause to return to the NBA if the lockout comes to an end in the middle of the season. HoopsHype

July 28, 2011 Updates

Free agent guard Acie Law is close to signing a deal with Partizan Belgrade of Serbia, one source told HoopsHype. The contract would be for one year and would not include an opt-out clause to return to the NBA if the lockout comes to an end in the middle of the season. HoopsHype

July 26, 2011 Updates
June 10, 2011 Updates

Growing up, life was just as much about war as it was about basketball for Krstic and Pavlovic. The two were less than ten years old when battles for independence in Yugoslavia ensued in the early 1990’s. Krstic was growing up in Kraljevo, Yugoslavia while Pavlovic lived in Montenegro. The effects of the strife were widespread. Even though the battles were not taking place close to them, both families were impacted. Krstic’s father, a construction worker, and his mother, a nurse, worked to bring home meager wages each month. “My parents worked -- and not just my parents, all people worked for like $10 a month, basically surviving,” Krstic said. “Inflation, every day was just really expensive. And there was war going on. The people in Serbia were going to fight in Bosnia and Croatia. A lot of people died. It was just bad. I was in elementary school back in the days and my parents tried to protect me and not see that stuff on TV and put food on the table every day, but it was a really tough time.” CSNNE.com

Pavlovic’s upbringing was similar. “We as kids didn’t go through a very nice childhood like everybody else did,” he said. “It was great, but it was always talking about war. Even though it never happened right where we lived, it happened all the way around us and it was involved with our people. “Back then there was nothing, you couldn’t buy anything. I don’t even know how they went through that, my parents and everybody. No money, no food. I lived on the coast and it’s a big port and my parents worked connected to ports. It was tough, but like I’m telling you, our people are kind of used to that, from generations back. I don’t know how we handled that, but it’s actually unbelievable.” CSNNE.com

The internal struggle continued throughout Krstic and Pavlovic’s childhood. In 1999, in response to a conflict in Kosovo, NATO began a series of air strikes that lasted nearly three months. Pavlovic felt the rumbles shortly before Krstic did. “It was scary, as much as I remember,” Pavlovic said. “I was at practice when the first bomb fell. It was actually like only five miles away from the place I was practicing. … I heard a loud sound and the gym was shaking. Everybody went back home and we saw the planes in the air. It was a little bit shocking.” Both had heard about the possibility of air strikes, but words could not have prepared them for the reality of them. "Everybody was just shocked and mad," Pavlovic said. “Actually, before practice we talked about that and we said there is no way they’re going to do that. There’s no reason to do that. And in the middle of the practice they did. Everybody was so shocked. But nobody was really scared because you just can’t believe that that’s happening.” CSNNE.com

The bombings near Pavlovic lasted only one night. For Krstic, though, the threat of danger lasted from late March into June. After an initial period of shock and fear, war became part of life. “It’s how we grew up,” Krstic said matter-of-factly. “It was scary. It’s scary when you hear air raids and stuff, but after a couple weeks you kind of got used to it. People stopped caring. You have two choices – stop caring – if the bomb’s going to fall on you, that’s your destiny. Or, you are just going to go insane and in panic. … Serbian people are very proud people. We take our pride and we don’t surrender.” CSNNE.com

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