HoopsHype Stan Kroenke rumors

January 31, 2011 Updates

So while the addition of Warkentien, a shrewd negotiator with a reputation as a relentless scout, bodes well for a Walsh-driven front-office structure going forward, the natural question is as follows: What does this mean for the Knicks' pursuit of Anthony? On one hand, teaming Warkentien with Walsh on the Denver trade negotiations would make it a decidedly unfair fight -- combining Walsh's experience with Warkentien's direct knowledge of the Denver power structure and Stan Kroenke's tendencies and psychology when it comes to deal-making. Sources say that Warkentien long ago zeroed in on Kroenke's negotiating weakness in any Anthony trade: his obsessive pursuit of cost- cutting. As Warkentien learned in a negotiating class he recently took at Harvard, the best way to win a negotiation is to know what the opponent wants and where his weaknesses are. CBSSports.com

Also possible, the source noted, is that Kroenke would redouble efforts to once again engage the Nets in trade talks as a far more palatable option than dealing with Warkentien. Another person with direct knowledge of the Nuggets' trade discussions has told CBSSports.com on multiple occasions recently that the Anthony talks have not evolved since the Nets dropped out last week. One reason may have been the Knicks' impending hiring of Warkentien, which sources say leaked to some members of Denver's basketball operations. CBSSports.com

So we now segue to the inevitable question of whether Mozgov was being showcased for inclusion in a possible trade for Anthony, a route the Knicks have been trying to maneuver down for the past several weeks by picking the brain of former Nuggets general manager Mark Warkentien about the best way to proceed forward. ESPN.com

"I don't know who put that deal out there. I'm pretty sure that could've been something to look forward to in New Jersey," Anthony said, but admitting with a chuckle he doesn't expect the Nets to call back. "I don't think the Nets will be calling. Nobody's going to come out publicly and do a press conference like that and then go back on their word -- especially a man like that," the superstar forward added. "He's a businessman. He doesn't conduct business like that. I take my hat off to him." New York Post

January 14, 2011 Updates

When Ujiri had a deal in place with New Jersey and Detroit over the weekend to finally move Anthony to the Nets, he backed away. Why? Stan Kroenke didn’t like the deal, a league source said. Never mind the three teams had all but agreed on it. For Kroenke, the Nuggets were taking back too much salary. “Kroenke has laid down a parameter they can’t take contracts back and they need to dump as much [money] as possible,” a league source said. Yahoo! Sports

September 27, 2010 Updates
August 26, 2010 Updates

With the way that CAA has tried to muscle and manipulate the market this summer, a source said Stan Kroenke, freshly approved as the St. Louis Rams owner, feels further emboldened in the NBA’s collective bargaining talks to push for a “franchise player” tag that teams could slap on superstars like the one the NFL uses. NBA owners are still far from seriously discussing that issue, but CAA’s manipulation of Anthony and Paul while under contract has become an increasingly sore subject within the league. Yahoo! Sports

Well, now he will deal with that spotlight too. The 30-year-old son of Stan Kroenke, the Nuggets and Avalanche owner, is now in line to take over for his dad. "Bottom line — it's exciting," Josh Kroenke said Wednesday. "Anytime you get a fresh face around, people are half-scared and half-excited about what you're going to do, and hopefully I can keep the excited portion going more than the scared portion." On Wednesday, Stan Kroenke officially became the majority owner of the NFL's St. Louis Rams, but because of the league's cross-ownership policy, his son — who spent the past three years in the Nuggets' front office — will gain management control over personnel and financial decisions of the NBA and NHL franchises. "There's not a whole lot that needs to be done on the organizational side with the Avs and Nuggets," Kroenke said. "I want to make it a fun working environment." Denver Post

"I've got a lot of experience working in finance and in sports, as well. Now they're merging," he said. "My dad and grandfather have taught me a lot about building a respected business, and their traits I'd most want to bring are hard work, diligence and making sound decisions based on information." Kroenke will continue to work primarily in the Nuggets' front office, but will have to spend more time than ever before on the Avalanche's business side. "The Avalanche has a great young foundation and a great leadership structure with Pierre Lacroix and Greg Sherman," Kroenke said. "I think the Avs are poised for continued success down the road. And the Nuggets, it was a tough season on a lot of levels. But by no means are we expecting to make significant regressions in the near future. We want to build a model that stays competitive year after year." Denver Post

August 25, 2010 Updates

It took the better part of the 2010 calendar year, but the St. Louis Rams' ownership question is finally settled. Stan Kroenke, the Rams' minority owner who also owns the NHL's Colorado Avalanche and the NBA's Denver Nuggets, was approved by a full and unanimous vote of the NFL owners. Kroenke already owned 40 percent of the team; now he's buying the remaining 60 percent of the shares from Chip Rosenbloom and Lucia Rodriguez, the children of deceased former owner Georgia Frontiere. The sale was forced by estate tax issues. "We are delighted with today's vote by NFL owners,'' Kroenke said in a statement released by the Rams. "It is one of the very high points of our long association with the NFL. We look forward to working with our fellow owners and Commissioner (Roger) Goodell as the transaction is finalized and in the years ahead. "Building organizations that win consistently is a challenge that we understand. We are excited about the opportunity as principal owner of the St. Louis Rams.'' FanHouse

August 21, 2010 Updates

Stan Kroenke has never been much for publicity, maintaining a low profile as the minority owner of the St. Louis Rams the last 15 years. Now the 63-year-old Missouri billionaire is making waves, challenging the NFL's rule against cross ownership with a bid to take full control of the team in a move that would give him at least a majority stake in a fifth professional sports franchise. Enos Stanley Kroenke, named after Cardinals baseball Hall of Famers Stan Musial and Enos Slaughter, has earned the nickname Silent Stanley. He rarely uses his office on the second floor at the Rams Park complex and there have been no Kroenke sightings during training camp, no appearances to gauge the downtrodden team's progress. "Stan's been focused on his end of the process and I've been focused on here," second-year coach Steve Spagnuolo said. SI.com

August 2, 2010 Updates

Stan Kroenke wants to buy the St. Louis Rams in two pieces instead of at once and pay interest to the current owners for holding on to a significant slice of the team for several years, multiple sources said last week. Two sources said some owners on the nine-member NFL finance committee, which met by conference call July 22 to review Kroenke’s latest plan, were upset by the offer because they are already stretching the limits of the league’s cross-ownership ban to accommodate Kroenke and had expected him to buy the Rams free and clear. NFL owners cannot own an NBA, NHL or MLB team in another football market. Kroenke owns the Colorado Avalanche and Denver Nuggets. Business News

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