HoopsHype Steve Nash rumors

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March 21, 2015 Updates

I'm retiring. I heard someone once say there comes a day when they tell us all that we can’t play anymore. We’re not good enough. Surplus to requirements. Too slow, maybe. When you’re a teenager with outsized dreams and a growing obsession, and someone tells you this ain’t gonna last forever, it’s scary. I never forgot it. So what did I do? Stayed obsessed. Set goals. Worked. Dreamed. Schemed. Pushed myself beyond what was normal or expected. I looked at my hero, Isiah Thomas, and thought to myself, “OK, I’m nowhere near the player he is but if I get better every day for 5 or 10 years, why can’t I be as good as him?” The greatest gift has been to be completely immersed in my passion and striving for something I loved so much — visualizing a ladder, climbing up to my heroes. The obsession became my best friend. I talked to her, cherished her, fought with her and got knocked on my ass by her. The Players' Tribune

I will likely never play basketball again. It’s bittersweet. I already miss the game deeply, but I’m also really excited to learn to do something else. This letter is for anyone who’s taken note of my career. At the heart of this letter, I’m speaking to kids everywhere who have no idea what the future holds or how to take charge of their place in it. When I think of my career, I can’t help but think of the kid with his ball, falling in love. That’s still what I identify with and did so throughout my entire story. The Players' Tribune

It will always hurt that Phoenix Suns fans didn’t get the championship they deserved during our run. Yes, we had some bad luck but I always look back at it and think, I could’ve made one more shot, or not forced a turnover, or made a better pass. But I don’t regret anything. The arena was always sold out and rocking. It was the time of my life. Thanks, Phoenix. The Players' Tribune

When I signed with the Lakers, I had big dreams of lifting the fans up and lighting this city on fire. I turned down more lucrative offers to come to L.A. because I wanted to be in the “fire,” and play for high risk and high reward in my last NBA chapter. In my second game here, I broke my leg and nothing was the same. Last spring, when I returned to the court, I was given a standing ovation at Staples Center. It was a dark time in my career and that gesture will be one of my best memories. There’s been a lot of negativity online, but in my nearly three years in L.A., I’ve never met anyone who didn’t show me anything but love and support for my efforts. There’s a lot of class in Lakerland, and the organization and staff have given me unwavering support. The Players' Tribune

March 12, 2015 Updates

Nash would get paid in any case, no matter the combination of medical insurance or actual Lakers money. He would've even gotten a little more from the Lakers if traded via a 15 percent trade kicker in his contract. Bleacher Report

What Nash has accomplished is working recently with fast-improving Lakers rookie guard Jordan Clarkson. The film work, on-court tutelage and timely text messages have been priceless, Clarkson said. Nash also intends to link up with Julius Randle, now on the practice court after breaking his leg on opening night, to tutor the current cornerstone of the Lakers' rebuild also. Bleacher Report

The current list of sidelined NBA stars is sobering—Derrick Rose, Chris Bosh, Carmelo Anthony, Kobe Bryant, Paul George, Dwight Howard, Blake Griffin, Steve Nash—but it is not the worst season on record. Not even close, according to Jeff Stotts, who tracks injury trends on his website, InStreetClothes.com. Stotts' data indicates that this season will, in fact, end up falling below the average for the last 10 seasons. Through the 60-game mark, NBA teams had lost 3,165 player-games to injury, putting the league on pace for 4,326 games lost this season. That's below the 10-year average of 4,577 and well short of last season's mark of 4,989 games lost. Bleacher Report

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