HoopsHype Tristan Thompson rumors

June 27, 2013 Updates
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With just one game left in the regular season, Tristan Thompson's pursuit of NBA history is now a long shot. That doesn't trouble the Cleveland Cavaliers power forward. He was closing in on a rather dubious distinction: becoming the most-rejected player in NBA history. For most of the season, nearly 17%, or one in six, of Thompson's shots had been blocked. That's well above the 6.3%, or about one of 16, average for the league, according to NBA.com's statistical website, and it threatened Danny Fortson's 16.7% rejection rate in 1997-98, which is the highest for anyone who has attempted at least 500 field goals in a season since 1997, the earliest for which NBA.com has data. Wall Street Journal

But after working with a former player that the Cavaliers brought in to help him get stuffed less often, Thompson appears safe from the record. Entering Monday's game, his blocked-shot rate stood at 15.3%. He's now battling Charlotte's Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, who gets 15.7% of his shots blocked, for the regular-season crown. That's still high. Before this season, only three players who attempted at least 500 field-goals in a season had blocked-shots rates above 15%. "There's no need to be embarrassed," said Thompson, a 6-foot-9, 240-pounder who was the fourth overall pick out of Texas in the 2011 draft. Wall Street Journal

April 6, 2013 Updates

Q: Any thoughts on who will win the Final Four? Tristan Thompson: I'm going to go with Wichita State. I hope Wichita State wins, because we've got two Canadians on the team. (Nick Wiggins and Chadrack Lufile.) The Shockers. If not, Louisville. Q: Did you see Louisville's Kevin Ware break his leg, and what did you think when that happened? A: We were in the locker room when the game was on, so we saw it happen. Our reaction was what everyone else thinks. Some of us turned. You don't want to look at it. You're just praying for the kid. I actually know the kid. In high school, Adidas would run these basketball clinics and he was there. He played for the Atlanta Celtics. Cleveland Plain Dealer

April 4, 2013 Updates

But one day after Cleveland was embarrassed at home by Brooklyn for its 10th straight loss, second-year Cavs forward Tristan Thompson decided it was time to defend Scott, who is just 62-160 in three seasons and may not be back for a fourth. "All the rumors about Coach Scott and hot seat and all that crap, that's bogus," Thompson said following Thursday's practice. "It's up to us to come out and compete and play hard because we're the ones out there. When he was out there playing, he won championships. So it's up to us to come out there and play." ESPN.com

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The BBVA Rising Stars Challenge -- televised live nationally on TNT at 9 p.m. ET and broadcast live on ESPN Radio, with live audio also available on NBA.com in multiple languages -- features two teams each consisting of nine rookies and sophomores mixed together, drafted from a pool selected by the NBA's assistant coaches. Joining Irving from the Sophomore class are: Kenneth Faried (Denver Nuggets), Brandon Knight (Detroit Pistons), Kawhi Leonard (San Antonio Spurs), Chandler Parsons (Houston Rockets), Klay Thompson (Golden State Warriors), Tristan Thompson (Cleveland Cavaliers), Nikola Vucevic (Orlando Magic), and Kemba Walker (Charlotte Bobcats). Davis and Lillard lead a group of rookies that includes Harrison Barnes (Warriors) Bradley Beal (Washington Wizards), Andre Drummond (Detroit Pistons), Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (Bobcats), Alexey Shved (Minnesota Timberwolves), Dion Waiters (Cavaliers), and Tyler Zeller (Cavaliers). Oregonian

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According to the website 82games.com, Thompson's shot is blocked 22 percent of the time when he throws the ball at the rim. Further, Thompson's attempts when "close" to the basket -- in essence, not a dunk but not a jumper -- is a staggering 37 percent. By comparison, Cavaliers center Anderson Varejao is blocked 4 percent of the time, overall, and 10 percent when he attempts a "close" shot. Enter the solution: Zydrunas Ilgauskas. Byron Scott brought in the former Cavaliers big man and current assistant to the general manager Thursday to teach Thompson a thing or two about how to avoid being blocked. Ilgauskas was strolling the Cavaliers practice facility in street clothes Thursday. The main thing Thompson needs to work on, Scott said, is making quicker decisions -- and moves. Cleveland Plain Dealer

"A lot of times [when] he gets it, he puts it on the floor and he's trying to gather," Scott said. "By the time you do all that, you've got two bigs or three guys surrounding you, and they're just trying to push him under the basket even farther. Now he's going up, and most of the time, it's against somebody who is 6-11 or 7 foot, so he's at a disadvantage." The 6-9 Thompson might be smaller than the 7-3 Ilgauskas, but the Lithuanian still has some tricks to teach. In Ilgauskas' final season in the NBA, with Miami, he was blocked 4 percent of the time and 15 percent of his "close" shots. " 'Z' has shown him some things I think can be really good for him. It's just a matter of him implementing it to be a little more effective," Scott said. "I think he has that in him. It's just a matter of continuing to do it." Cleveland Plain Dealer

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The Cleveland Cavaliers have exercised the third-year contract options on guard Kyrie Irving and forward/center Tristan Thompson, Cavaliers General Manager Chris Grant announced today from Cleveland Clinic Courts. “Kyrie and Tristan exemplify what we want to be as a team and franchise, both as players and as people,” said Cavaliers General Manager Chris Grant. “They are dedicated, hard-working, talented individuals and we’re looking forward to their continued growth and success here in Cleveland as Cavaliers.” NBA.com

October 13, 2012 Updates

The question now is whether he’ll get markedly better in his sophomore campaign. Bets are on that he will, and considering how hard he worked in the offseason, it’s hard to imagine him not experiencing some measure of improvement. “The summer is what makes you in terms of the NBA,” Thompson said. “This summer I wanted to put in a lot of time getting stronger and continuing to work on my craft, especially in the post. Big men really only need two or three shots—the hook shot left and right, the turn-and-face and a counter. I worked on that all summer, and I’m going to be doing it in the game.” HoopsWorld

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