HoopsHype Vlade Divac rumors

January 4, 2013 Updates

The fact is Kahn and Adelman love the thought of Gasol in their offense. Adelman's recipe for success in Sacramento was due in large part to Chris Webber and Vlade Divac. The Wolves look at Love and Gasol as comparable to that duo. Gasol is an excellent passer. Adelman loves big men who excel at that. A team source said Taylor is willing to go over the luxury tax for the 2013-14 season if the right deal presents itself. With a salary of nearly $20 million next year, Gasol fits that mold. 1500 ESPN

October 13, 2012 Updates

At 6-foot-11 and 235 pounds, he should have an easier adjustment than his predecessors. The position no longer has bruisers such as Shaquille O'Neal, Patrick Ewing or David Robinson. With the exception of Dwight Howard and Andrew Bynum, Bosh will face competitors who are mostly glorified power forwards. Bosh said the move is "over analyzed" because the evolution at center. "The game was different back then," he said. "The game changes every now and then. At that point, it was all about girth. You have to be big, Anthony Mason and Charles Oakley and Patrick Ewing and Vlade Divac. It's different now. The game is a lot faster. If you're big, we're going to run right by you. South Florida Sun-Sentinel

October 8, 2012 Updates

During the Olympics you have met with NBA commissioner David Stern in order to discuss the matter of flopping. How do you comment the new anti-flopping rule? Vlade Divac: “They started overdoing it, I think it was bad for basketball and it was a great decision to make basketball more clear”. EuroHoops.net

October 4, 2012 Updates

Both Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol suggested that the FIBA rule for international play of a warning for the first flop and then a technical foul for the next (meaning two free throws and possession for the opponent) was better. "I'd love to see it have an impact on the game itself," Bryant said. "I think in international play a technical foul is the penalty for it. Free throw and get the ball back, that sort of thing. But I like the rule. Shameless flopping is just a chump move. We're familiar with it because Vlade (Divac) kind of pioneered it in a playoff series with Shaq (O'Neal). And it worked pretty well for him." Orange County Register

August 9, 2012 Updates

The year was 2005, and he was, at 36, a still-reasonably-productive Los Angeles Lakers center in his 16th NBA season. Life was, for the most part, very good. He was playing basketball in the city he loved alongside the legendary Shaquille O'Neal and the soon-to-be-legendary Kobe Bryant, eating at the finest restaurants, staying in luxury hotels. Just happy, happy, happy ... Then, The Moment. "I came home from a road trip," he says. "No different from any other road trip I'd been on. It was 2 a.m., and I check on my kids, who are sleeping. And I see a man sleeping in one of the beds. It was my older son [Luka], and it really hit me. I thought to myself, 'Wow, I missed all of his childhood.'" SI.com

That's why, as the man leading his nation's Olympic charge, the words, "We must win ..." never emerge from Divac's lips. Sure, he craves triumphs, just as the United States does (he is a dual citizen, and owns a home in Los Angeles). But when Divac is asked about the victory-or- bust approach of certain nations, he cringes. "It's all about pride, and doing your best, and representing your country with honor," he says. "Yes, I will celebrate wins. But I will celebrate spirit even more." SI.com

July 15, 2012 Updates

The year was 1996. The Cavs needed "bigs" in the worst way and had two first-round picks — Nos. 12 and 20. They had settled on Wright State's Vitaly Potapenko at 12 and Zydrunas Ilgauskas at 20. In hindsight, Z was a much better player, but that's an argument for another day. Before the draft, the Los Angeles Lakers were calling teams in the lottery and inquiring about moving up. They found a taker in the then-Charlotte Hornets, who had the 13th overall pick, who agreed to deal their pick for Lakers center Vlade Divac. The Lakers offered the same deal to the Cavs, sources say, but were turned down. The Hornets drafted Lower Merion (Pa.) High School star Kobe Bryant and dealt him to the Lakers. News-Herald

November 11, 2011 Updates

Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond, Jerry Krause and Vlade Divac top the list of new nominees with league ties for the Hall of Fame, NBA.com learned Friday. They are among a field that joins returning headliner Reggie Miller as candidates for the Class of 2012 in Springfield, Mass. The group is, in many ways, a continuation of the '11 class. Chris Mullin was inducted in August, and now friends and Run TMC namemates Richmond and Hardaway are hoping to follow. The strength of the Divac nomination is his international impact and contribution to the worldwide growth of the game, much the same way Arvydas Sabonis was elected, with his NBA contributions secondary on the resume. NBA.com

August 17, 2011 Updates

Boza Maljkovic, who is currently with the Slovenian national team in Kranjska Gora preparing for EuroBasket, has spoken for Zagreb-based newspaper Sportske novosti and on the occasion said he would yet speak out on Divac. - “Am I surprised? Well, I am and I’m not. I could have expected something like this from Divac – he is a cheat and a liar who is ignorant of the facts. Now he feels the need to defend my former player Zdovc from myself, and I am surely more of a friend of Zdovc’s than Divac. He is also forgetting the fact I did not succeed Zdovc and that Memi Becirovic was in charge of Slovenia at the World Championships. Blic

The reporter who interviewed Divac was totally inconsiderate towards Divac and asked him a question in the morning, and Divac was still dazed as he usually gets up around 3 pm – that’s why he was saying nonsense. I will most probably deal with the life and work of Divac more seriously after the EuroBasket is over because I don’t have the time for that now,” Maljkovic responded bitterly. Blic

August 15, 2011 Updates

What is one of your favorite pranks you instigated? Vlade Divac: “I had a lot of them but I’ll pick one you’ll really like – it’s about Bobby Jackson. He lost some (card games) on a plane and, obviously, we were so close that we didn’t want to take each others’ money. But I told him, ‘You don’t need to pay me, but you need to be in your underwear and check-in to the hotel in New York.’ So that happened. We were laughing and had a lot of fun — ask Bobby about that!” sacramentokings.tumblr.com

August 14, 2011 Updates

In 1989, the league welcomed Divac and Zarko Paspalj (Serbia), Petrovic (Croatia), Sasha Volkov (Ukraine) and Sarunas Marciulionis (Lithuania). Later, it was Hakeem Olajuwon, Tim Duncan, Rik Smits, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili, among others. Opening-day rosters last season listed a record 84 international players, including NBA Finals MVP Dirk Nowitzki (Germany). "Vlade was one of the pioneers," said Kim Bohuny, the NBA's senior vice president of international operations. "He was a dominant player who was funny, a real character. He invited Americans into his living room to learn about his country and himself. And he was very open about things." Sacramento Bee

He spent the past several days in Slovenia participating in Basketball Without Borders, the NBA-sponsored program that brings together youths from regions in conflict and attempts to foster peace and friendship. "Vlade was involved in the very beginning," Bohuny said of the first BWB held 10 years ago in Treviso, Italy. "I remember we were shooting an anti-drug commercial, and a spokesman from the United Nations said, 'The (Balkans) war is over. We've tried everything to get these kids together. We tried music; we tried soccer. Nothing works. But the thing that might do it is basketball. Vlade, would you ever be interested in something like this?' He said, 'Yes, absolutely.' Then I called Toni Kukoc, and right away he said, 'I'm in, too.' " The event this year not only was held in Slovenia, the first republic to split from Yugoslavia two decades ago, but for the first time, all six of the former republics were represented. "It was just an incredible week," Divac said. "The kids got along great, had good times. I think this is very important." Sacramento Bee

August 11, 2011 Updates

The Basketball Without Borders camp held this week in Ljubljana, Slovenia, served as a celebration for everyone involved. For the NBA and the international governing authority FIBA, it was a milestone achievement -- the 10th anniversary of an idea created from the former Yugoslavian wars. For Divac, it was something more personal. "What had happened was Vlade and I were in the [NBA's] New York offices on a Sunday, where he was shooting a commercial for the United Nations,'' recalled Kim Bohuny, the senior vice president of international basketball operations who essentially serves as the NBA's global ambassador. "A gentleman from the U.N. said, 'We don't know what to do -- we've tried music, we've tried soccer, and nothing is working to get our young children together. We think the only thing that could possibly work is basketball. Do you think the NBA would be interested in bringing together young children from all six countries?' " SI.com

Petrovic died at 28, in a 1993 car crash, before they could repair their relationship. So volatile were the times that Divac felt he had no choice but to stay away from Petrovic's funeral. "I feel sad that he's not here with us today,'' Divac said from Slovenia. "If he were alive, he would definitely be part of this. Part of what brought us together is the NBA, because we were too far from home.'' Several former NBA players who helped run the initial BWB camp -- including Rasho Nesterovic, Dragan Tarlac, Bruno Sundov and Dalibor Bagaric -- regathered in Slovenia this week with Divac. "Life is too short,'' Divac said. "What we try to send to the kids is a message that they should believe in themselves and respect each other, have tolerance for each other and have fun. Live the life in the right way.'' SI.com

October 17, 2010 Updates

Divac and Petrovic once were best friends, and you would think that would count for a lot/something. But there are certain parts of the world where nationalistic pride dissolves bonds once thought indelible. Not saying that's right or wrong, just how it is, and watch a soccer match between two former warring nations and see if you don't agree. I'll never forget the tears that welled in Divac's eyes when I asked about the troubles back home, knowing I never would understand them in the way he did. Las Vegas Review-Journal

October 12, 2010 Updates

How did this documentary come about? Vlade Divac: I’ll be honest here, it was [executive producer] Dion [Cocoros’s] idea. He knew about my life and relationships with the players from that generation. He came up with the idea and said it would be nice to give people the opportunity to see not just basketball from my career, because everybody knew about that, but nobody knew about what was happening behind closed doors. ESPN.com

Hearing you go through take after take [in the recording studio] just saying Drazen’s name, has it made you think about things you haven’t thought about in a long time? Vlade Divac: Especially with Drazen, because he’s not with us anymore, it’s tougher. It bothers me so much after all these years that I never had the opportunity to sit with him and go through our problems that we had. Before everything happened, we were roommates on the [Yugoslavian] national team. We had the same goals and we supported each other for the first couple years of the NBA. Basically, we opened the door for all those internationals because we had some trust as European players. Before, it was very tough to break through. ESPN.com

October 3, 2010 Updates

After Team USA’s crushing loss in the 1988 Olympics to the Soviets (the Americans were reduced to bronze medal status), Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski had been assigned to help the US regain its pride, taking a team that included Christian Laettner, Alonzo Mourning, and Billy Owens to Buenos Aires for the Worlds. The Yugoslavs shook off a preliminary-round loss to Puerto Rico to knock off the Americans in the semifinals and then the archrival Soviets in the gold medal game. “People talk about the 1992 American team being the Dream Team — well, this was our Dream Team from Europe,’’ said Vlade Divac, the former Laker and King. “We had a great team with a lot of guys who played in the NBA. We were special.’’ Boston Globe

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