HoopsHype Yao Ming rumors

September 12, 2014 Updates
August 11, 2014 Updates

Former NBA all-star center Yao Ming is now dishing out assists to much wilder targets. After retiring from the Houston Rockets in 2011, Yao returned to China and set out to end his homeland's traditional appetite for endangered and threatened animal products. As an ambassador for international conservation organization WildAid, Yao has campaigned to persuade his countrymen to give up the key ingredient in one of their traditional delicacies: shark–fin soup. The “I’m FINished with Fins” campaign, which also featured Jackie Chan, soccer star David Beckham and NBA player Jeremy Lin, has been credited with reducing the tens of millions of sharks killed for their fins each year in China by at least 50 percent. NBC

June 27, 2014 Updates
June 26, 2014 Updates

Embiid has said that his back has healed, and a league source said that’s true, though the source added that a team would be wise to have Embiid engage in back-specific training to further strengthen it. The foot issue is more of a question mark because centers have a bad history with navicular bone fractures; they notably ended the careers of Yao Ming and Bill Walton. Boston Globe

June 19, 2014 Updates
June 14, 2014 Updates
May 27, 2014 Updates

Retired basketball star Yao Ming said "anything is possible" amid speculation that the former Houston Rockets center is putting together a bid for the Los Angeles Clippers with Chinese investors. Yao, who owns the Shanghai Sharks basketball team in China, is assembling a group to buy the Clippers franchise, sports channel ESPN reported on its website, citing unidentified sources. The National Basketball Association told owner Donald Sterling last week that it intends to force a sale in the wake of racist comments that got him banned from the league for life. "I know there are a lot of rumors, but I don't think I have time to clarify the rumors one by one," Yao, 33, told journalists on Sunday in Beijing, where he was attending a graduation ceremony at a basketball school named after him. "Nowadays, sports are globalized, and anything is possible, but so far, there is nothing substantial." China Daily

May 24, 2014 Updates
May 23, 2014 Updates
May 15, 2014 Updates
March 7, 2014 Updates

Yao Ming talks to reporters on the sidelines of the second session of the 12th CPPCC National Committee on Mar. 6. (Photo/CNS) Former NBA star Yao Ming on Thursday called for the eradication of sales of illegal animal products in China through legislation and the promotion of animal protection awareness among the public. "Buying ivory is buying bullets," Yao, a member of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), told reporters on the sidelines of the ongoing annual session of the country's top political advisory body. Want China Times

March 1, 2014 Updates

SLAM: You’ve said you still follow the NBA closely, so you’ve noticed the League’s shift toward small ball. If you were still healthy and still at the top of the game, how do you think you’d fit in now? Yao: I’ve thought more than once about how I would compete in today’s basketball if I was still healthy and in my best shape. I think, if you can make enough free throws, or create enough free throws, you can still be effective. Otherwise, you probably need to run with the small ball. Someone like Shaquille O’Neal could create enough free throws for himself. He was very dominant and could change the pace of the game with that. But, the shooting skill today is so incredible. The three-pointer is so easy today. I think they should extend the line even another meter farther [laughs]. The defense is much more stressed by the range. And obviously, players with size like me would find it much more difficult to guard a shooter. So…[today’s NBA] definitely would not be easy for me. SLAM

The game has changed. Basketball is a form of knowledge. Sometimes I compare basketball skill to war weapons. Think about war weapons through history. In the beginning, if people wanted to knock down some big towns they needed those big machines, like catapults, and they were huge. Consider that they are centers. And then came the fire guns. When the fire guns first came out how big were they? [Motions with his hands] They were huge. And then they became smaller and smaller, and now the pistol is only that size [shows the size of his palm]. That is the skill and shape of a player, you see. The first nuclear weapons, the first missiles were so big, but now, they can be very small. Consider a player’s skill and body like a weapon. The weapon has gone from huge to small, but their damage is the same or even greater now. The point guards are the smaller and more powerful weapon nowadays. And they are mobilized. More mobile. Easy to transport, easy to ship somewhere, easy to sneak into somewhere like cutting into the lane. That’s what I think. SLAM

February 15, 2014 Updates
December 19, 2013 Updates

Sanders comes to PMK*BNC from BDA Sports Management, where as chief marketing officer he matched his clients with international brands like Coca-Cola, American Express, Apple, Guinness and Bridgestone. He will bring a roster that includes actors, models and sports personalities to his new agency, although he will share joint representation for client Yao Ming with BDA. The Hollywood Reporter

November 28, 2013 Updates

On class days, Yao Ming, the 7-foot-6 retired N.B.A. center, wakes up at the crack of dawn to beat the Shanghai traffic. Carrying a lunch prepared by his wife, Ye Li, a 6-foot-3 former player in China’s professional league, Mr. Yao drives more than an hour to Jiao Tong University, where he sits through his required courses in the economics and management department. According to one Chinese news report, Mr. Yao would prefer to live in the dorms with his 20-year-old classmates, a move that would save time and energy, “but the beds are too small.” “When I signed my first professional contract with the Shanghai Sharks at age 17, I promised my parents that, after my basketball career ended, I would pursue my studies at the university level,” Mr. Yao told reporters in Shanghai. New York Times

November 24, 2013 Updates

Any rumor missing? E-mail us at   hoopshype@hoopshype.com.