Storyline: Milwaukee Bucks Arena

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The first steel beam was hoisted Monday at the construction site for the Milwaukee Bucks’ new arena, just yards from where the team plays at the BMO Harris Bradley Center. But the Bucks have two more seasons to call the Bradley Center home and they plan to make the most of it. “I love the Bradley Center, the aroma that it has, the feel,” Bucks forward Jabari Parker said. “Just looking at those banners – especially those runs they made in the early 2000s – it’s something we want to get done before going on to a new arena. “We want to leave a mark and go out on a high note.”

In about two years, the Bucks will make another move, from the BMO Harris Bradley Center to a $524 million, state-of-the-art facility just north of the present building. On Saturday the team held a ceremonial groundbreaking ceremony featuring politicians, team officials and former players. Shovels hit the ground and the dirt flew at the construction site near N. 4th and W. Juneau streets. Current Bucks player Jabari Parker, who was on hand for the ceremony, believes the transition will be an exciting one. “I think our arena is going to be more welcoming, like the Barclays (Center) or the new places they have built,” Parker said.

The new facility’s design will have a lower level that offers more intimate views of the game, possibly echoing the closeness felt in the Arena in the 1970s. “It was a great place to play,” said former Bucks forward Bobby Dandridge, who was present for Saturday’s ceremony, along with Oscar Robertson and McGlocklin from the 1971 champions. “There were no barriers that prevented the fans from seeing you or waiting for you after the game. Security was not an issue. The only thing between the locker room and the court was a curtain. That was it.”

The new Milwaukee Bucks arena’s proposed design received its first city approval Monday, helping prepare the $500 million project for a planned construction start this summer. The Plan Commission voted 4-0 to recommend approval. The detailed plan development also needs Common Council approval. The preliminary endorsement came despite concerns raised by some commission members about what they said was a need for additional landscaping to better blend the arena with the surrounding neighborhood.

The first detailed glimpse of the new downtown Milwaukee arena reveals a giant building with a dramatically arcing roof, curving body, tall sheets of glass, social spaces — and a few challenges yet to overcome. The Milwaukee Bucks will share the development plans with the City of Milwaukee on Thursday; several renderings were released in advance to the Journal Sentinel. They are considerably more detailed than the conceptual renderings released in April 2015 and represent the first step in a public design approval process that’s required for construction to begin.

The public’s first opportunity to formally comment on part of a $500 million funding plan to build a new Milwaukee Bucks arena attracted an overflow crowd Monday evening, with one group questioning how the city has enough money to help pay for the project but not neighborhood or school investments. The packed City Hall meeting began the final stage of a process that could see Milwaukee keep or lose an NBA franchise that has called the city home for nearly 50 years. Without a new arena by 2017, the NBA has said it will buy back the team and move it. The Bucks currently play in the 27-year-old BMO Harris Bradley Center.
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September 21, 2017 | 5:25 am EDT Update
After missing the Knicks’ voluntary workouts, Porzingis, seemingly in no hurry to return, will be at Monday’s start of training camp for Media Day. He may or may not explain his shocking and unpopular decision to blow off an exit meeting with Jackson, Mills and Hornacek. According to an NBA source, Knicks brass was happy with his performance in Europe and fine with the timing of his New York return. (Hernangomez, whose Spanish squad won bronze, and Kuzminskas haven’t arrived to Tarrytown either; Euro training camps began in late July for the trio.)
Coach Nate McMillan said he has a starting lineup in mind heading into training camp, but wouldn’t reveal it. He did acknowledge, however, that Lance Stephenson likely will start the season as the sixth man. Stephenson likely will play starter minutes, but his versatility and energy makes him a logical candidate for playing off the bench. “I hope he can establish (that role),” McMillan said. “A sixth man is like a starter, and he can be a guy who can do a lot of things with that second group with his ability to handle the ball, score the ball. He’s an unselfish player.”
But after the trials of last season, Jackson is confident that after an off-season geared toward doing a better job of managing the chronic case of tendinitis, he is back to normal. “One hundred percent would always be great to feel, but this year I just want to be better than I was the day before,” Jackson said Wednesday at the practice facility in Auburn Hills.
Storyline: Reggie Jackson Injury
The days of coaches looking at a player’s offseason workout regimen, skeptical of the work load and maybe the credentials of whatever personal guru was administering it, appear to be over. Just as teams’ medical staffs have grown accustomed to injured players seeking out second opinions from orthopedists of their choosing, so have they gotten used to cooperating with, and sometimes embracing, their guys’ trainers into a comprehensive, full-calendar fitness program. Now some of the trainers who work with NBA stars far away from the lights and the cameras may be stars. Rob McClanaghan, Tim Grover, Idan Ravin, Chris Johnson and several others have or have had devoted followings among the league’s biggest names. A facility in Santa Barbara, Calif., called Peak Performance Project – “P3” for short – is a Mecca for players seeking the latest and greatest in bio-mechanics and training techniques.
Scott Brooks, Wizards: “Being a former player, I kind of know all the tricks. One of the tricks is: ‘I lifted a lot of weight this summer and bulked up.’ That’s a trick. You didn’t ‘bulk up,’ you just gained weight. And your body fat percentage is higher. When a player starts the conversation with that, you know he’s not in shape. But we touch are players all summer, we text them – that’s the only way you can communicate with some, who never check their voice messages – but you know once guys come in. The guys we’ve had come in the last couple weeks, I see no problem with their conditioning. … People who always say ‘The old school was better,’ taking all of October to get into shape, that’s one place the old school wasn’t better. … Guys are in shape. It’s big business.”