Adam Silver Rumors

After announcing in July that this All-Star event would be moved, in essence, the law isn’t consistent with the league’s values, Silver has expressed his desire to return to Charlotte in 2019 if it is changed. “We’d very much like to get back there,” Silver said. “We had a discussion (Silver and North Carolina governor Roy Cooper) so I understood, certainly, his position, when he was running for office, was anti-HB2, the bill that ultimately led to our leaving. So I really was talking to him more to understand, from his standpoint, how he was hoping to move forward in terms of changing that law. My main purpose of talking to him was to express our desire to return next year.
It is one of many issues drawing the attention of both the league and its players, with many NBA stars — including LeBron James — speaking out repeatedly of late about the need for equality in society. And Silver, while not going as far to say that considering such a law would keep Texas from being considered for All-Star events in the future, made clear that the NBA is watching. Next year’s All-Star weekend is in Los Angeles. Texas last hosted an All-Star weekend in 2013. “I’m not ready to draw bright lines,” Silver said. “Clearly, though, the laws of the state, ordinances, and cities are a factor we look at in deciding where to play our All-Star Games.”
Speaking at his annual state-of-the-NBA address on the eve of Sunday’s All-Star Game, Silver was asked about the age minimum and if it’s an issue that doesn’t need a collective bargaining agreement negotiation to revisit. “Well, first of all, we absolutely need the union in order to revisit the age,” Silver said. “The current age minimum of 19 years old, but something Michele and I discussed directly — and this is different than last time we negotiated a Collective Bargaining Agreement — is that rather than say to you that talk to us in seven years when we sit back down to negotiate a new Collective Bargaining Agreement, I think she and I both agree that it’s the kind of issue that needs to be studied, in essence, outside of the bright lights of collective bargaining.”
3 days ago via ESPN
Storyline: CBA talks
“I do recognize that there isn’t an easy solution to that problem, and I’m sympathetic to fans who turn out — whether they buy tickets to games or watching games on television and don’t see their favorite player on the floor,” NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said during his annual All-Star Game press conference Saturday night. “But we also have to be realistic that the science has gotten to the point where there is that direct correlation that we’re aware of between fatigue and injuries. “And as tough as it is on our fans to miss one of their favorite players for a game, it’s far better than having them get injured and be out for long periods of time. So we’re always still looking to strike that right balance.”
NBA commissioner Adam Silver is “disheartened” that the meeting he brokered between Charles Oakley and Knicks owner James Dolan didn’t lead to a positive resolution, but he remains hopeful that peace can be reached. Silver said Oakley and Dolan apologized to each other when they met Tuesday, but Oakley was “emotional” and not ready to return as a guest at Madison Square Garden.
Storyline: Charles Oakley Incident
“I do have concern about travel bans,” Silver said. “Putting aside the justification for them for a second, because I don’t have access to the same intelligence obviously or security information that people in the government do, but we are a business based on global mobility. As I said earlier, 25 percent of our players were born outside of the United States. We do a tremendous amount of business on a global basis, and if you think about what the NBA stands for, it’s, in essence, the very best all coming together, the very best in the world all coming together to perform at the highest level.