Barcelona Rumors

The obvious answer is Laettner, but Jordan’s fomer Bulls teammate Dennis Rodman, a Hall of Famer in his own right who also won titles with Thomas in Detroit, disagrees. He says that … wait for it … Larry Bird should’ve been left off the Dream Team. Here’s what the Worm had to say during a recent interview on Sirius XM’s “NBA Today”: “I just think the fact that — I don’t know the issues of Michael (Jordan) and Magic (Johnson) and whoever, (Charles) Barkley, and stuff like that, if they didn’t like Isiah. But for me, I felt Isiah should’ve been on that team because of the fact that he deserved it,” Rodman said.
“I think that the fact that, even though a lot of people will try deny it or try to correct me when I’m wrong, he should’ve been there instead of Larry Bird. Because Larry Bird was hurt, injured, he could barely play, and he was on that last leg of his career. “I understand, again, the presidential treatment, because he did so much for the game, but I just think for Isiah, I think they should’ve put him on that team without Larry Bird, and that’s my opinion.”
They’re back, though, in a big way for the Wolves this season — as was a rare 5 p.m. Saturday game in Chicago a week ago — partly for this reason: Midafternoon in Minnesota is 9:30 p.m. in Barcelona and prime time, too, elsewhere in neighboring countries and cultures where the evening’s activities just start later. The first soccer game NBA vice president of global media Matt Brabants ever attended in Madrid started at 9:30 p.m. “I thought it was ridiculously late,” Brabants said. “We had dinner at a restaurant at 8, which was early. Everything starts later. Watching a game at 9:30 on a Sunday or midnight on a Saturday is pretty normal for Europeans, so it works to our benefit.”
Stern also wants to discuss whether NBA players should continue to play in the Olympics or if there should be an age cutoff. He admits the “Dream Team” that won gold in the 1992 Barcelona Games and helped grow the game globally was a good move, but he sees merit in questions raised by often-controversial Dallas owner Mark Cuban and his peers about their players risking injury in the process. “Usually when Mark says something, I try to go the other way,” Stern joked, “but actually when he is right about something – he may actually be right and here I think he actually has a point. I really do.”