Dan Fegan Rumors

For all the understandable comparisons between Cousins’ situation and that of superstars like Carmelo Anthony (Melo-Drama in Denver) or Dwight Howard (Dwight-mare in Orlando), there’s one common thread that has been largely ignored by the masses: Cousins’ agent, Dan Fegan of Relativity Sports, who has long since become the industry leader in applying the kind of pressure to a team that he hopes leads to a trade of his choosing.
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Cousins’ agent, Dan Fegan, would like to steer his client to the Lakers, who can offer Julius Randle and this year’s No. 2 pick — though rival teams doubt the Kings would send Cousins to a division rival. The Knicks are another team on Cousins’ list, but all the Knicks have to offer is the fourth pick (which, bear in mind, can’t officially be dealt until the Knicks use it, since their 2016 first-rounder already has been traded).
This rumor is part of a storyline: 10 more rumors
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Pacers point guard Donald Sloan has spent the offseason in his hometown Dallas, reshaping his career in more ways than one. As Sloan prepares for his summer of free agency – grinding through two-a-day workouts and day long pick-up games – he has switched representation. Sloan, who approaches his fifth NBA season, will now be represented by sports agents Byron Irvin and Dan Fegan of Relativity Sports. The deal was finalized on Friday night. “Some things weren’t happening the way they should have with who I was represented by the last few years,” Sloan told The Star, “so I just figured now’s a good time as any to make the switch.”
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Deandre Jordan makes sense here on a lot of levels. He’s a younger, more explosive version of Chandler who should continue to smooth the edges of his defense. Jordan’s agent, Dan Fegan, is close with Mark Cuban. And Jordan is exactly the sort of player who might gamble on a short-term deal to reenter free agency again when the cap leaps. He’ll only turn 27 this summer, he never gets hurt, and he’s already banked more than $40 million from the Clippers. Changing teams on a short-term deal would still cost him some money, but if he times things right, he could reduce the shortfall to the point that it wouldn’t hurt — especially given the tax advantages Texas has over California. It gets trickier for any player who changes teams via a one-year deal, since they forfeit their own Bird rights — limiting the raises their incumbent team could offer. Signing a two- or three-year deal makes it easier.
The agents for DeMarcus Cousins – Dan Fegan and Jarinn Akana – have no issues with Karl taking over as head coach and only wanted clarification on the franchise’s repeated changing of direction in its coaching search plans this season, sources said. The Kings had initially planned to let Corbin coach the rest of the season, and then conduct a full search of candidates in April. Fegan and Akana were surprised over the timing of another coaching change, especially after they had been assured at the time of Malone’s departure the franchise would wait until the offseason to conduct a full search of candidates, sources said. Along with Cousins himself, Fegan and Akana were proponents of Malone and had been against ownership’s decision to destabilize the team and fire the coach early in the season.
Cousins’ agents, Dan Fegan and Jarrin Akana, have been adamantly opposed to Karl’s hiring. But general manager Pete D’Alessandro appears to be willing to make the move without their consent. If that remains the case, and if Kings owner Vivek Ranadive approves as well, then the Kings may be on the verge of fixing what’s broken with their fractured basketball team. D’Alessandro was expected to discuss the situation with Cousins’ representatives on Sunday afternoon. As it were, one of them told The Sacramento Bee on Sunday that they were not blocking the hiring. “Make the move; we don’t run the team,” the representative who was not identified by name reportedly said.
On Nov. 4, ASM Sports and Miller filed a notice to appeal. But it is clear Fegan and Relativity Sports are pleased with the judge’s decision, which was rendered without the means for Miller and ASM Sports to amend the complaint. “We were able to show the judge through briefings and a hearing that they failed to state a claim,” Relativity Sports lawyer Heather Karatz said. “Even assuming these baseless allegations are true, there’s still no claim here. It became evident to the judge that this is the nature of the basketball player representation and business. Players change agents during their career when they want new representation. In Larry’s case, Larry and Happy had a history.”
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Not often does one player leaving one agency for another result in a lawsuit but that’s what happened after Milwaukee Bucks center Larry Sanders left agent Andy Miller and ASM Sports for agent Dan Fegan and Relativity Sports in the summer of 2013 during the height of free agency. Last month, a New York judge dismissed that lawsuit, which accused Relativity of client stealing and sought financial compensation, and ruled the “Defendants’ motion to dismiss Plaintiff’s complaint is granted for failure to state a cause of action.” The ruling is vindication for Fegan, president of Relativity Sports’ basketball division, and Happy Walters, the CEO of Relativity Sports, who was also a defendant in the complaint filed nearly a year ago.
“It created the most amount of problems for them,” Cuban said. “The trade kicker not only made [the contract] more expensive, but the opt out [after Year 2] could create a Kevin Love-type situation for any teams interested in trading for him, where you don’t know if he’s gonna opt in or opt out.” The impact this three-year pact and its various complications had on Parsons’ fate has some league observers wondering now if shorter contract offers from big-market teams to future restricted free agents, such as the San Antonio Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard and Minnesota Timberwolves’ Ricky Rubio if they make it to the open market next July, will become more commonplace. “The contract structure was extremely creative,” Cavs general manager David Griffin said. “I think it will be a significant moment in the way restricted free agency discussions are handled in the future.” Said Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace: “The concept of a short-term offer sheet is intriguing and could be the wave of the future. With the reduction in the decision time to match reduced to three days, the team who writes an offer sheet is only out of action for a short period of time. [So] there is no downside. If the sheet is not matched, you have your player, and if it is matched, then the player will be back on the market soon, which increases the pool of players in free agency two or three years down the road.”
About a week into the process, Fegan decided it was time to try to propose something different. And that led him to the three-year construction, featuring the Year 2 player option and a maximum 15 percent trade kicker. He then took to it Cuban, convinced that the new formula would put the most pressure on Houston to let Parsons go if the Rockets hoped to maintain the utmost flexibility. For the following reasons: Players in the first year of a matched offer sheet can’t be traded without their consent. With the ability to become a free agent after the second year, Parsons would likely have diminished trade value to small-market teams fearful he’d simply leave at the first opportunity … while also potentially dissuading big-market teams that prize flexibility from trading for him and then seeing Parsons decide to opt in for the third year. The trade kicker in this contract could also prove to be even more expensive than usual, were Parsons to be dealt, if the salary cap rises as dramatically as some are projecting thanks to the TV money expected to pour into the league in the near future, as ESPN.com’s Larry Coon explains in greater detail here. And in the Rockets’ case specifically, Parsons’ possession of an option to become a free agent in July 2016 meant he and Howard would likely be returning to the open market at the same time, which figured to be uncomfortable for Houston.
In one of his first interviews after Houston elected not to match the Mavericks’ offer sheet to Parsons, Morey told SportsTalk 790 AM in Houston: “That structure of that [contract] is literally one of the most untradeable structures that I’ve ever seen.” The wrinkle that made it so: Parsons signed a tricky three-year deal with the Mavs, with an option to return to free agency after Year 2, as opposed to the four-year offer sheet Dallas, or any other external suitor, could have lavished on him. Quite a difference that one year made. Parsons and his agent, Dan Fegan, were convinced they’d receive a meaty offer sheet as early as July 1 or, by the latest, July 5. But the four-year pitches being presented in those early days of free agency were all coming in well shy of max territory, thanks to Houston’s effective campaign to convince the outside world the Rockets were going to match whatever came their way.
“Daryl told me this process is going to be frustrating and you’re going to read a lot of stuff you’re not going to like, but at the end of the day, you’ve worked hard for this and you’ve earned this,” Parsons said. “He warned me it could get ugly at times once the media gets involved and that you’re gonna see people say you’re not worth this or you’re not worth that. [Morey] just sat me down and said, ‘Go out and sign the best contract you can. Just know in the back of your head that we’re gonna match the contract.’ “Dan was trying to negotiate something with them early, and, to be perfectly honest, I would have accepted a lot less money early in the process to stay in Houston. But they told me they wanted to wait for the whole LeBron and Melo situation [to play out], which I understood. I just listened to them. I signed the best deal I could for my own career.
It should be noted that though I have no idea what other items would be on that list, there were two “interesting” things that happened around that time — the Rockets hired Howard’s former trainer with the Orlando Magic and they later added Dwight’s brother to the Rio Grande Valley Vipers, though it was largely believed that he wasn’t a good enough prospect to make that jump. See JR Smith-Chris Smith for how nepotism package deals can work.
So Minnesota president and coach Flip Saunders has to make a decision on his willingness to extend Rubio’s rookie contract with a deal that corresponds with a belief the T’wolves see him as franchise cornerstone. Saunders has had discussions with Rubio’s agent Dan Fegan and they’ll talk more between now and the Oct. 31 deadline. Without an extension, Rubio can be a restricted free agent next summer.
The league’s new labor agreement in 2011, thanks to one of the union’s many concessions, moved up the deadline for signing qualifying offers to Oct. 1. Otherwise this saga potentially could have dragged out even longer. Or have you forgotten Anderson Varejao’s foray into restricted free agency in the summer of 2007? In that instance, Varejao’s agent Dan Fegan rejected what he felt was an unworthy offer from the Cleveland Cavaliers and waited until December until he landed the offer sheet he felt Varejao deserved. Charlotte eventually came through with a two-year, $11 million pact that the Cavs ultimately matched … after playing without Varejao for the first two months of the season.
Next year’s starting five will likely be Rubio-Martin-Wiggins-Young-Pekovic. Can we say this is Rubio’s moment? Darren Wolfson: Rubio is on notice. The Wolves are trying to sign him to an extension, and so far his agent, Dan Fegan, is balking at the idea of a 4-year, $43 million deal. That’s plenty for a player of Rubio’s caliber. It’s a lot more than Atlanta point guard Jeff Teague makes — maybe a better player — and is what Golden State All-Star guard Stephen Curry makes. But Fegan is seeking the 5-year max. That’s not happening. The situation is pointing toward Rubio being a restricted free agent next summer. In other words, the 2014-2015 season is huge for Rubio. He should improve his shooting under Flip and we know he has unbelievable athletes to cut to the hoop and catch alley-oop passes.
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The Wolves could chase a splashier trade for someone else’s productive/expensive player, but doing that may require the inclusion of Pekovic or Rubio. Pekovic has value, but he’s also 28 and slated to earn nearly $12 million in 2017-18. Rubio is among the most divisive players in the league now, in part because of the sense that his agent, Dan Fegan, is going to demand an eight-figure extension that Rubio does not yet deserve.