Danny Schayes Rumors

I have written a book on this very subject entitled “Fast Broke,” which is being excerpted on SheridanHoops.com and can be purchased via Amazon.com for $14.95, and I recommend that if you read only one of the excerpts, read the one entitled: “How to Go Broke on $100 million.” It is a lot easier than you might believe. For athletes, the biggest mistake that is made over and over again is not really understanding how their current lifestyle will impact their future lifestyle. Even if they have a nest egg when their playing days are over, that is often not enough. Here’s why:
via SheridanHoops
While there was plenty of blame to go around, the bottom line is that when the relationship breaks, things go into the crapper at warp speed and there is little chance of fixing it. For the Nuggets, it seems likely that major changes will result from this. Good chemistry is almost impossible to pull from a bad situation like this one. A new coach will naturally want to remake the roster, so look for the Nuggets to be bad for a while. It’s a shame for a team that was so close to getting over the hump. The team didn’t contend again in LA until they reworked the roster after getting Shaq and Kobe. In Orlando, the Magic weren’t good again until they gutted the roster and built around Dwight Howard.
via SheridanHoops
I’m biting my tongue trying not to laugh. This is going to be great! Luckily I didn’t have a beeper so I can just enjoy the show. The damn beeper won’t stop beeping. Finally Magic focuses in on Vlade Divac, who has his hand in his pocket trying unsuccessfully to turn it off. “Vlade, hand me the beeper” says Magic. Vlade hands it over sheepishly. Magic holds it up and says, “See this is exactly what I am talking about” and he turns around and throws it like a fastball into the wall, WHAM. It shatters into a million pieces. Vlade looks like a fish on the dock. His gills are moving furiously but no sound is coming out.
via SheridanHoops
wpid-i_b3_f5_77_186973933.jpg
Then Magic started off. He called guys out on how they just wanted to be Lakers for the parties and the girls. He reminded them how nobody at the parties cared about them, just that they were Lakers. Since they didn’t take care of business, next year they would be gone and the girls would be interested in whoever else was wearing the Laker uniforms. Right about then somebody’s beeper went off. It is 7:20 in the morning and a beeper goes off (remember it’s 1994). Magic stiffens up like a hunting dog and starts zooming in on the sound. It’s muffled like its in a gym bag but the room is pretty small and we can all hear what direction it’s coming from.
via SheridanHoops
wpid-i_6e_e6_51_182451035.jpg
Danny Schayes: When I met later with Steve Blake, I was a little dismayed that he had not read any of the material that I submitted. It showed that either he was not fully prepared or I was not being taken seriously. Still we did the interview and again, I thought that it went as well as it could. In both of their defense, they were dealing with injuries while trying to manage these interviews that were being done on the fly. Again, this is what you get when the process is done during the season — distracted players.
via SheridanHoops
Danny Schayes: • The less athletes know, the easier it is to “manage” them. That’s code for CONTROL, the key to player representation. Player “management” is the golden ticket to the money train. Billions of dollars are at stake. • They are forced to rely on professional advisors in areas that they know nothing about. Many players are totally dependent on their advisors with no real way to understand them. • Varied agendas are held by the agents, the teams, the league, the posses, the families, and numerous other entities. The turf wars are a thing of beauty. • Players are forced to operate in areas that are totally foreign to them. They might as well be reading Chinese.
via SheridanHoops
Danny Schayes: • Athletes, like entertainers, have the biggest disconnect between how much they earn and what they know about money and finance. They are paid like CEOs of billion dollar companies without having a clue about money. • They are trained from childhood to be coached and managed. They grow up being surrounded by folks telling them what to do and where to go. Their world is sports, and it is consuming mentally and physically, leaving room for little else. • Once in the pros they are represented by agents who tell them “just play, I’ll take care of everything else”! They have financial dealings with dozens of people who’s job it is to separate them from their money. Like Elvis, they become surrounded by “friends” and advisors who have no incentive to help them become educated.
via SheridanHoops