David Falk Rumors

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The realistic high-end target is Greg Monroe of the Pistons, who waited out his qualifying offer to become an unrestricted free agent this summer, but figures to attract ample attention and will be seeking a max deal. Monroe, too, might be out of the Celtics’ reach. (Another factor: Monroe is represented by David Falk, who also has Jared Sullinger. Think he wants to put them both on the same roster?)
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When asked about Hibbert’s reaction to comments made by Bird and Vogel, Hibbert’s agent, David Falk, replied with an e-mail to The Indianapolis Star: “We will respond at the appropriate time.” Falk suggested his client would take his time to choose to opt-in for the final year of his contract. “We will decide that in late June,” Falk wrote in an e-mail. If Hibbert decides to stick with the Pacers, he will get paid more than $15 million for the 2015-16 season. That number provides plenty of reasons to weather any ignominy as a backup center. However, the Pacers have been turning away from Hibbert for a while now.
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Jackson is also very familiar with Monroe’s agent, David Falk, who represented Michael Jordan during Jordan’s playing days under Jackson in Chicago. So when the season comes to a merciful end on Wednesday night, Knicks fans may be hoping to see a big game from Monroe to not only see what he can do on the Garden floor but also potentially hand the Knicks a loss to help increase their lottery odds.
Monroe instead signed a $5.479 million qualifying offer, turning down four years at about $14 million from Detroit — “Most players would have taken the money,” Falk said — in exchange for the privilege of becoming an unrestricted free agent this summer. “Greg is one of the brightest clients I’ve ever represented,” Falk said. “He’s very mature, he’s very intelligent, he’s very thoughtful, he’s very analytical. I laid out all the options and he decided that he wanted to have options.”
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Two days after Greg Monroe said he wasn’t seeking a trade from the Detroit Pistons, his agent, David Falk, emphatically reiterated his client’s position. “He made a commitment to Stan (Van Gundy) when he took the qualifying offer that he would work as hard as he could and help the team as best that he could and he would keep his mind open and at the end of the season, he would evaluate all of his options,” Falk said. “That was his plan in July, and that’s his plan in December and that will probably be his plan in February and will be his plan when the season ends.” Their comments were in response to a Sporting News story that suggested Monroe wanted out of Detroit at any cost. Falk refuted that.
Turner is 6-foot-7 and a mix of shooting guard and small forward, while Green, two inches taller, is a small forward or stretch 4. But there is some overlap. And the presence of Jared Sullinger and Kelly Olynyk at power forward would seem to push Green toward the 3. “I’m not concerned,” said agent David Falk, who represents Green, Turner and Sullinger. “I don’t think Evan Turner coming in is going to supplant Jeff Green. But it’s impossible to figure out how Danny (Ainge) is going to solve the puzzle. That’s the challenge, and Danny’s a very intelligent man. I’m sure he will find a way to solve the puzzle.”
“We picked Boston as much for the historical culture and for Brad, as for anything else,” Turner’s agent David Falk told CSNNE.com on Tuesday. Falk, who also represents Jeff Green and Jared Sullinger, discussed how Boston’s use of versatile players in the past influenced his client’s decision to sign with the Celtics. There were two teams that Turner was seriously considering. Falk declined to reveal the other team, but a league source indicated that it was the Minnesota Timberwolves. “If you look back into the 1980s when you had Danny (Ainge) and (Dennis Johnson) in the backcourt, (Kevin) McHale and Larry upfront … there was a lot of diversity in the way the players were used,” Falk said. “Evan’s a multi-dimensional player.”
Monroe’s agent, David Falk, will hit the market seeking a max deal for Monroe, and he could well get it—Monroe is a skilled 25-year-old big man who has averaged 14.0 points and 9.0 rebounds, and those are not easy to find. A good example is Monroe’s fellow Georgetown Hoya Roy Hibbert. In 2012, Hibbert was a restricted free agent coming off a year in which he averaged a pretty mundane 12.8 points and 8.8 rebounds. Yet he was offered a four-year max deal worth $58 million by Portland, and the Pacers were forced to match it. Hibbert’s agent is Falk, too. He is supposed to be retired, but Falk is still a strong influence around the league. “If anyone is going to find a max deal for Monroe, it is David,” the GM said. “They will be aggressive and try to find something in the early stage of free agency. Remember, he was the agent for a guy who is now a team owner. It’s just a matter of whether the Pistons can get something back.”
THE AGENT TO both Patrick Ewing and Michael Jordan isn’t saying he believes it. David Falk isn’t telling me that on the day of the first-ever NBA draft lottery, in 1985, then-commissioner David Stern really froze the No. 1 envelope — rigging the drawing to deliver Ewing to a sputtering league’s biggest market. “I don’t adhere to it,” Falk tells me. “I’m not saying it happened.” Then comes a pause that seems to drag on forever. “But,” he offers, “that theory is plausible.” For 92 minutes on a Sunday afternoon, I’ve listened to the formerly most powerful representative in the game explain the difference between truth and plausibility, between reality and perception. And like many around the league, it turns out, Falk does not think every alleged conspiracy is created equal. He laughs off the notion that Stern strong-armed Jordan into a gambling-addiction-induced retirement in ’93. “That’s a silly one,” Falk says. “Michael called me at home, on a Saturday, and said, ‘I’m going to retire.’ Did Michael’s leaving help the NBA? No!”