David Kahn Rumors

The real problems, though, were much the same as during Garnett’s stay: historically poor management decisions, not enough help on the court and something of an intractable, country-club culture undercutting any player’s or players’ intensity or urgency. Love chafed at the Wolves’ losing, at four head coaches in six years and at former GM David Kahn’s frequently expressed view that Love really wasn’t a franchise player.
Taylor and David Kahn, then president of basketball operations, decided in January 2012 to offer Love a four-year contract extension rather than the five-year maximum “designated player” deal that Love wanted. To convince him to sign, they offered the option of becoming an unrestricted free agent after three years. Taylor was asked if he now considers that decision a big mistake. He paused before answering. “Let’s wait one more year to answer that question,” Taylor said. “I think it’s a good question to ask at this point because Kevin has played as well as we hoped, and maybe even better. To have him tied up long probably would be better than not, but we still have one more year and we’ll see. My hope is it doesn’t make any difference, that Kevin can get the money one way or another and we’re in position to do that.”
So it was on the night of the 2011 lottery, when former Timberwolves general manager David Kahn bristled at the sight of the Cavs’ winning the No. 1 pick (and Duke’s Kyrie Irving). “This league has a habit, and I am just going to say habit,” Kahn told reporters, “of producing some pretty incredible storylines.” Then he pointed to how, the year before, the widow of late Wizards owner Abe Pollin had curiously shown up on the night Washington won No. 1 (and Kentucky’s John Wall). And how, on this night, Cavs owner Dan Gilbert had his 14-year-old son, Nick, who suffers from neurofibromatosis, by his side. When he saw Gilbert’s son, Kahn concluded, “we were done.” Kahn later swore that he was joking, but it was too late: A familiar public message had been sent. The soap opera had started anew. “There have been so many instances of what I would call, as a lawyer, ‘the equity of the situation working itself out,'” Falk tells me, referring to how often ostensibly ideal outcomes become actual ones. “And if you hooked owners up to a lie detector, they would admit to thinking that too.”