David Stern Rumors

Me: Do you believe that people who don’t know you think you’re a racist? DF: I can’t control what everyone out there believes. I think most people, if they’ve looked into this, they’ve heard people that have known me for 30 years. They’ve looked into my background. They’ve looked at my life. And hopefully used all of that information when they make their decision. But I can’t control what everyone looks at and how much they look at this whole story. And that hurts. That’s sad to me, because I really am proud of being part of this melting pot of the NBA throughout my life — not just my career, but my whole life. And it’s something I’ve always taken a lot of pride in, the diversity and inclusion that I’ve been a part of through the NBA. It’s been a model, with David Stern and Adam Silver and the league, what they’re built. I’ve been a part of that and I’m proud of that.
There were years when Russell wasn’t such an important part of league celebrations. But a few conversations with David Stern enticed Russell back, perhaps one of the most overlooked moves of the former commissioner. And Russell is indeed giving back. He loves to talk, offer his knowledge, and spend time with current players. Quietly, it also seems that Russell enjoys being lauded late in his life. Whatever issues he had with the NBA have dissipated, and the league has given him the proper appreciation for what he has accomplished. So, while it was an unusual to see Russell waiting for James well after midnight, it was heartwarming to watch those who paused to marvel at Russell. He definitely noticed.
And now the franchise deals with an NBA/Cuba situation a different Heat source said “seems political.” Longtime former NBA commissioner David Stern was extremely active in Democratic politics and a major financial contributor throughout his years in office. New commissioner Adam Silver also was an ardent early supporter of Obama and has donated to the party — the political leanings at the highest level of the NBA perhaps suggesting a climate that would lead to a goodwill tour as a show of support for Obama’s new policy of thawing relations with Cuba. The four-day event could be a precursor to further league involvement with Cuba, such as exhibition games scheduled there.
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Rick Welts: The thing that I get credited with, maybe that I’ll always live with, is the creation of the NBA All-Star Weekend. It wasn’t really as visionary a thing on my resume as people might want to credit me for. I was in the unenviable position of trying to sell the NBA to major corporate sponsors at a time when the NBA was not viewed as a good investment for companies like that. I knew that if we could create some additional events, I’d have a chance at least to try to create some corporate interest in sponsoring those events. That, really as much as anything, was my motivation in trying to create a second day of events around All-Star: that we could bring the fans with the support of some corporate partners, and that really was an important part of launching [NBA Commissioner] David Stern’s success.
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Stern asked to buy one of his drawings featured in the magazine — a portrait of Al Pacino in “Carlito’s Way.” “Is he the consigliere of the Gambino family? What is going on?” Mason recalls thinking at the time. Stern paid $500 for the work, though Mason now admits he was so flattered, he would have given it to him for free. The unconventional exchange between commish and first-year player was just the tipoff for Mason’s not-so-average life off the court.
Stern, who retired after three decades last February and has been staying busy as the CEO of DJS Global Advisors, said Dolan’s email isn’t even a blip on the radar when it comes to serious concerns the NBA has had to deal with over the years. “That’s a nothing,” Stern said. “There have been some serious issues in our time from Magic (Johnson’s HIV) to Ron Artest to you name it, we’ve dealt with it. This doesn’t raise … this is just New York at its best, which is let’s make something out of nothing.”
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Speaking at the 14th annual Cal Ramsey Distinguished Lecturer Series in Sports Management at New York University, Stern was asked what he would have done with Dolan if he were still commissioner. “Would I discipline James Dolan for that email?” Stern asked. “Why would I do that?” “We have our own brand of due process,” Stern later added. “In terms of all the things that people should be held accountable for … if you are looking for every email that gets sent to a fan who sends a nasty email, I’m sorry … that’s almost beneath the commissioner’s duties.”
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NBA commissioner Adam Silver has made advocating for legalized sports gambling a priority since he assumed office last February, repeatedly calling for a reformed approach to a subject that has long been taboo for America’s biggest sports leagues. He has a supporter in his former boss, ex-NBA commissioner David Stern, who said Wednesday morning that he agrees with his protege on the subject. “I think I agree with Adam,” Stern said when asked about gambling in an interview on CNBC’s SquawkBox morning show. “Once daily fantasy became an acceptable exception to the law against gambling, I think that’s gambling, so now I think the best approach would be, as Adam Silver has advocated, is for there to be federal regulation. Bring the sports leagues in. If it’s going to happen, because it has happened anyway by Justice Department rulings and the like, you should make it legal and you should regulate it as tightly as you possibly can.”
Stern explains in the interview how ten years ago the league’s statistics were primitive in comparison to what they are today. Each franchise’s front office now sports a squad of statisticians whose job is to crunch data in order to hone strategy and field a more competitive team. This new focus on analytics represents a major change in the way the game and its players are evaluated by fans and professionals alike. It’s very “Moneyball,” though larger and much more orange.
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When you serve as leader of an organization for as long as David Stern did, you’re bound to encounter massive change in multiple realms. The 30-year NBA commissioner, who last year spoke to Big Think on embracing diversity, appears in today’s featured Big Think interview focused on big data’s indelible effect on professional basketball: Stern mentions at the outset how the NBA decided to install SportVU cameras in each of its 29 arenas. These cameras, developed by analytics organization STATS, create in-depth accounts of every play in a game. For example, they can capture player positioning as well as ball location for every dribble, pass, and shot by way of X/Y/Z coordination. This is then translated into hard data which, after a large sample is gathered, can then be analyzed to better evaluate players and temper game strategy.
I didn’t see it then, but now I see it all from Nov. 19th 2004 (the night of the Brawl) until this bad relationship between me and the NBA ended I was fated to fail. I would say I was sorry but I would do it again so I attempted to explain myself. I wanted to say that I hated my life and constantly thought of ending it; I wanted to say Jim was trying to bully me; I wanted to just let it all out — my mom being checked into mental institution, my ex getting an abortion, my problems wanted to flow, but instead, I tried to intellectualize the situation. I wanted to try to have the public view me as a patriot for the millions of minor, non-violent, drug offenders who were serving minimum mandatory sentences, a voice for those who were afraid too of the system, but all I did was catch the ire of David J Stern and his lackey Billy Hunter.
The biggest baller in the stands during NBA games isn’t Spike Lee or Jack Nicholson or even Justin Bieber — it’s Jimmy Goldstein … who spends more money on NBA tickets than anyone else on Earth. You’ve seen Goldstein on the court at various NBA games over the years — and this week he confirmed what ex-NBA Commish David Stern has said … that he’s the NBA’s biggest investor when it comes to tickets. As for how Goldstein made his fortune, that’s a bit of a mystery — but point is, the guy drops BANK when it comes to basketball.
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Who could forget the former NBA commissioner citing “basketball reasons” for vetoing the trade that was supposed to send Paul to the Lakers, Pau Gasol to Houston and Lamar Odom to New Orleans in December 2011? The Lakers appeared to have acquired their most dynamic point guard since Magic Johnson, but then small-market owners raised a racket, Cleveland’s Dan Gilbert in particular calling the trade a “travesty” in a lengthy letter to the league. David Stern said no. The deal was off. “Sometimes you want to say, ‘Dammit, David Stern,'” Lakers Coach Byron Scott said before Friday’s game. “When they made the trade, before David kind of X’d it, I was like, ‘Wow, that’s going to be fantastic.'”
Stern, who oversaw work stoppages that resulted in missed games in 1999 and 2011, said he’s unconcerned about that perspective among players. “The league’s not going to be losing money,” he told CBSSports.com. “That’s great. And the players get 50 percent of it. … As a league we were losing money [during the 2011 lockout] and my guess is, as a league, when the new TV deal kicks in, they’re going to be making money. That’s a guess; I don’t have the numbers. Some teams lose money voluntarily.”
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Addressing reporters before the Hornets-Bucks game, Stern, 72, said his successor, Silver, handled Donald Sterling’s removal as owner of the Los Angeles Clippers “perfectly.” “I have a little bit of a different view of Adam,” Stern said. “I don’t consider him a neophyte. We had been working together for 22 years and the line between what I was doing and what he was doing was not clearly demarcated.”
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Despite ominous statements from prominent players like LeBron James and Kobe Bryant about how the NBA’s new TV deal will affect collective bargaining, former commissioner David Stern said Wednesday night he believes the league will avoid a work stoppage in 2017. “I think that our players are very smart and successful and they have hired what seems to be a smart and successful litigator,” Stern told CBSSports.com. “Our owners are smart and successful and have got Adam Silver, an accomplished litigator, too. And I have no doubt that they’re going to work it out.”
Julius Erving, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan and David Stern are all names synonymous with the NBA’s rise in popularity during the 1980s. But there were, of course, key personnel in the league office building the foundation for success in the decades to come. Terry Lyons was one of those individuals. In fact, he filled some of the most important roles behind the scenes. ““Terry Lyons’ enormous contributions to our media relations efforts for almost three decades have been a key driver to our growth, domestically and internationally,” Stern was quoted as saying in a statement posted on Lyons’ website. ” He has grown up with the NBA and the NBA has grown up with him. Terry has traveled the world on behalf of the NBA and Team USA, spreading the basketball gospel. He has worked arduously to enhance international media coverage of our teams and our games and he has made the NBA office a welcoming center for the global basketball community and international media. We will miss him greatly, and wish him continued professional success and much personal happiness.”