David Stern Rumors

When asked about his thoughts on Laura Ingraham’s comments on Fox News about Lebron James, in which Ingraham said James should “shut up and dribble” as opposed to voice his opinions about President Trump, Stern said, “Just because you’re an athlete that doesn’t mean you give up your rights as a citizen.” He continued, “It’s like asking me if I think athletes should vote.” “As an American you should speak about whatever moves you. If you feel like speaking out on something then you should speak out.”
Commissioner Stern also noted his thoughts on Ingraham: “I’m very familiar with that particular group (Fox News), and I’m not a big fan of Laura Ingraham, but she and Lebron are entitled to their own opinions.” “I just think the President is jealous because Lebron has many more social media followers than he does,” he added.
Some of the big headlines in sports today press on ongoing scandals plaguing the NCAA. When asked if he thought the NBA G-League could become an alternative for young athletes not looking to play in college, Commissioner Stern was clear. “I would hope so. It’s a complete fraud the whole thing.” He continued, “I’m a harsh critic of the NCAA for taking players that they know aren’t there to learn and in many cases, don’t go to classes in their second semester. Instead they put them in online classes just to finish the year so they don’t lose their scholarships.” “So there is something very bad going on and everyone blames the NBA’s ‘one and done’ rule.” He adds, “Well the NBA doesn’t have a one and done rule; the NBA’s rules says players have to be 19; it doesn’t matter if they go to college.”
Storyline: NCAA Scandal
In the past decade or so, the NBA has had two prominent opportunities to address the issue of sexual harassment in its workplaces. Both times the league fumbled badly, so that when, this week, Sports Illustrated published a damning portrait of the culture of workplace harassment within the Mavericks office, there should have been little surprise. Both instances involve the Knicks and their handling of the lawsuit brought in 2007 against the team by former executive Anucha Browne Sanders. The league, under commissioner David Stern, offered no punishment of the Knicks or coach and team president Isiah Thomas at that time. The NBA ignored the issue again after Knicks owner James Dolan and Thomas spoke out on the subject in 2015 when the Knicks rehired Thomas to oversee the WNBA’s Liberty franchise. That happened under Adam Silver’s watch. As New York employment attorney Kevin Mintzer, one of Browne Sanders’ lawyers, sees it, the NBA is now reaping what it has sown.
But the fact is, the NBA sent a message back in 2007 when the Browne Sanders lawsuit against the Knicks was originally filed and no punishment was doled out by Stern. That message: This is not our business, and we won’t hand out punishment for it. Silver backed up that message after the 2015 James Dolan- Isiah Thomas interviews on HBO. And here we are. “The message should be that these events — despite what you have allowed, what you have indulged, what you have turned your head away from in the past — OK, clearly it is not going to fly,” Mintzer said. “If you purport to be a progressive league and you purport to have values in which you care about injustice to people’s color and women, but you allow workplaces like this to fester and do nothing when something is shown to be seriously wrong, then no one will take you seriously. “The only time they’ll do something is when there is public pressure to do something. My expectation is Mr. Silver will get religion on this only when he feels he has to.”