Dennis Lindsey Rumors

The NBA’s free agency period begins this week, and the Utah Jazz front office will hit the phones hard as soon as it begins Tuesday night at 10:01 p.m. (July 1 back East). “I don’t want to build up expectations and under-deliver, but we’ll have those conversations very aggressively,” Jazz general manager Dennis Lindsey said. “We feel like we have a unique city and organization to sell with some really good players.”
Jazz General Manager Dennis Lindsey will represent the team on stage, while Jazz President Randy Rigby will also be in attendance for the 2015 NBA Draft Lottery. This will be the first time Lindsey has served as the Jazz team representative during the NBA Draft Lottery. Kevin O’Connor (in 2004-06, 2010-11), Rigby (2013) and Bryan Miller (2014) were the Jazz’s on-stage participants for each of the franchise’s seven previous Lottery appearances.
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It’s as though the Jazz brought Ingles in to help Exum, and then they discovered he could help them in other ways. He’s finishing a one-year deal and will be a free agent this offseason. Dennis Lindsey recently was complimentary of Ingles, saying: “He’s exceeded our expectations as a teammate and a competitor. He’s an NBA player. He’s proved that this year. Hopefully, his experience has been good enough that he’ll consider us when the time comes.”
Q: Do you think you will make a roster move now? Dennis Lindsey: “So we have 15 now. Some are partially guaranteed, some are non-guaranteed, so we do have some flexibility. We’re comfortable with where we’re at. Again, someone’s misfortune is another’s opportunity. Certainly Rodney [Hood] will get a lot of those minutes. We wanted to see Rodney as a two-guard so here’s a little bit of his opportunity. Last night, Dante [Exum] played a lot with Trey [Burke] and Dante’s certainly big enough to hand the position as well. And then there are some guys who haven’t received as much opportunity, Ian Clark, Toure’ Murry, Patrick Christopher, that we’ll be able to kick the tires a little bit and take a look at. And as you can imagine, we’ll be evaluating what’s available to us. But frankly, Quin’s very comfortable with where we’re at and we’ll see how the young guys do.”
Q: What changed over the last couple of weeks? Dennis Lindsey: “Just over time we got more information. As you guys know, it was no secret, Alec was wearing a pad and has a previous history. As we went through more pre-hab, practices, games, I think we got more and more information and the reality of the situation, I think, hit Alec as well. … Just that running conversation as much as anything.” Q: Can you tell us more about the injury? All we’ve been tad is that it’s a shoulder injury? Dennis Lindsey: “Yeah. I’m a layman, so I really can’t. I’ll let the medical experts. We’re bound by HIPAA on what exactly we can share. It’s a fairly common shoulder injury in contact athletes, and we’re very confident that he’ll come back 100 percent given the history of this type of injury”
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Q: Did the team know about his shoulder issues when you worked out his four-year, $42-million contract extension? Jazz general manager Dennis Lindsey: “Yeah. We knew because we knew about it during the draft. This is an inure that predated Alec and the Utah Jazz. … Really, I think as much as anything, the reason why he was so durable is a credit to Alec, [trainer Gary Briggs and strength coach Mark McKown] and all the pre-hab.”
“Alec’s long-term health has been our top priority throughout this process, and although it is unfortunate that we will be without his services on the court the rest of this season, we commend Alec’s commitment and continued effort to play through considerable pain to this point,” said Jazz General Manager Dennis Lindsey. “After continued consultation with our medical staff, Alec and his representation, we have unanimously agreed that it would be most prudent for Alec to have this procedure performed now in order to ensure that he will be healthy and ready for the start of next season.”
Utah’s no vote actually has a chance to hurt the Jazz in June — especially if they were to win 35 or 40 games and finish just out of the playoffs. That could potentially deprive the franchise of adding a transcendent player to an already-talented core. But for Utah execs, the reasoning is simple: At the end of the day, they’re still running a small-market team. And being loyal to those interests outweighed everything else. “We looked at the long run, and how this may affect us and teams like us,” Lindsey said. “We think that we have a chance to outperform expectations. But we voted no because we were looking at the next 30 years — not now or in the short term.”
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If the proposed reform had been in place last season, the Phoenix Suns (49 wins) would have had a 47 percent chance at a top three pick — almost the same odds as the Jazz actually had. “This is something that will come up again in the near future,” Phoenix coach and former Jazz star Jeff Hornacek said. “There are some concerns about this, both ways. I’m not completely sure what the answer is, but I think there needs to be a common ground.” Here is why the Jazz — among the smallest of small teams — voted against lottery reform: Around the league, the proposal was seen as one more way for the big market teams to gain an advantage over those in smaller markets.
“We’re going to be very aggressive in free agency,” he said, “and tell our story and tell what a great place this is to live and play.” Lindsey used a comparison with Green Bay in the NFL, saying that he believes there is a star-type player (or more) that might fall in love with Salt Lake City and Jazz fans and choose to settle his roots in the Beehive State instead of in a glitzier city.
General manager Dennis Lindsey said the Jazz “really appreciate” how Burks has expressed his desire to stay in Utah. “The mindset of being part of something, being a part of the Jazz tradition is very important to us,” Lindsey said Saturday morning. “The Millers are very proud of this organization’s history, so when a talented young player tells you that, it lends you to a position that you want to strike a deal if possible.” Burks’ new bench boss, Quin Snyder, has been a vocal supporter since joining the Jazz in June. Both player and coach agree that Utah’s work-in-progress, open, quick-pace system suits Burks’ fluid and fast-playing style.
General manager Dennis Lindsey and team president Randy Rigby will travel to Boise, Idaho, on Tuesday morning to make what a press release forwarded from the Utah Jazz described as a “major announcement” regarding the future of basketball in Treasure Valley. In other words, the Jazz and Idaho Stampede are finally going to announce what has previously been reported: They’re joining together in an exclusive one-on-one affiliation. This will be the third time Utah and Idaho have been partners, although this time the Jazz will be the Stampede’s only NBA affiliate.