God Shammgod Rumors

He first joined Cooley’s staff as an undergraduate assistant in 2012, but he is now a graduate assistant after recently receiving his degree. As he continues to gain experience on the sideline and help guards make huge strides, he’s being recognized as a coach with a lot of potential and the ability to help players better themselves on and off the court. “During my last year in China, I was kind of a player-coach and I had trained their National Team’s guards for the Olympics so that gave me my first taste of training players and coaching,” Shammgod said. “I decided to forgo the final year of my contract in China to come back to the United States and finish my degree. When I got drafted, I promised my mother I would finish my degree. So I decided to do that and when I returned to Providence, everyone embraced me so much. I started helping MarShon Brooks and some other guys work out. It was a great fit and it took off from there. That’s when I realized I wanted to coach.”
“The first person I ever trained in my life was Kobe Bryant,” Shammgod said with a laugh. “I was going into the 12th grade and he was in the 11th grade and we were at the ABCD Camp. We would get up early every day at the camp and I’d show him some dribbling moves and things like that. I’ve always liked to help other players and show them some things. That’s always been in me since day one, and I’ve kind of been training people my whole life without really knowing it.”
This week, Shammgod, 38, is back in New York for the Big East tournament at Madison Square Garden and back with the team he once starred for. He is again a student at Providence, but now he is an undergraduate assistant for the men’s basketball team, which won last year’s tournament. Shammgod attends practices and games and has earned praise from Coach Ed Cooley and the Friars players for his ability to teach and motivate. Because of N.C.A.A. rules, he is not allowed to be paid for his work and he cannot recruit players. But he views the role as an apprenticeship that will prepare him for his goal of becoming a college or N.B.A. coach.
Shammgod’s father planned to attend Providence’s game Thursday afternoon against St. John’s in the quarterfinals. He will also be in Providence on May 17, when his son is expected to receive an undergraduate degree in leadership development, 20 years after Shammgod first enrolled at the college as a McDonald’s all-American from La Salle Academy in Manhattan. “It will be a dream come true,” Shammgod said. “I’m just happy that I’m going to accomplish it.”
These days, Shammgod is not a performer but a teacher, a role he has always enjoyed. He said he showed Kobe Bryant dribble moves when they were both at the prestigious ABCD summer camp in high school. When Shammgod played in China, he worked with guards on the national team there. In the past three years at Providence, he has had a role in the development of guards Bryce Cotton and Kris Dunn, who were both first-team all-Big East selections.