Gregg Popovich Rumors

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 A student asked, of course, whether the Spurs were going to win a title, and here was one of the emotional high points of the day. Coach Popovich responded: “Win the championship? I don’t know, but it’s not a priority in my life. I’d be much happier if I knew that my players were going to make society better, who had good families and who took care of the people around them. I’d get more satisfaction out of that than a title. I would love to win another championship, and we’ll work our butts off to try and do that. But we have to want more than success in our jobs. That’s why we’re here. We’re here so you’ll understand that you can overcome obstacles by being prepared and if you educate the hell out of yourself. If you become respectful, disciplined people in this world, you can fight anything. If you join with each other and you believe in yourself and each other, that’s what matters. That’s what we want to relay to you all: that we believe that about you or we wouldn’t be here.”
Popovich has always been in frequent communication with his point guard, but said Parker’s knowledge of the system and understanding of his limitations have helped him remain integral despite less offensive production. The 34-year-old Parker has taken it more upon himself to speak up, to get his teammates where they need to be, to feed Leonard and Aldridge when they have obvious mismatches and to, as Popovich said, “understand when we’re in mud and need something different.” “I’ve said it many times: As long as Pop is happy, and the Spurs are happy with what I’m doing, that’s all I care about,” Parker told The Vertical. “I can’t control what people are going to think. Or what they think I should do, because I’m not going to let my ego be above the team. The team is the most important, and for me, if I have to defer or be less aggressive to make sure Kawhi keeps going and LaMarcus be who is, I will do it. I never cared about my numbers.”
“[There are] a lot of talented teams in the NBA, but not everybody can sustain it for 15, 20 years. [There’s] a reason for that, though. Because everybody is so unselfish and nobody lets their ego be above the team,” Parker told The Vertical. “I think it’s unbelievable, through David, Timmy, Manu, me, then Kawhi, LaMarcus. It starts with the top. R.C., Coach Pop, the way they carry themselves, it’s all about the team. That’s what we want to do. “I always say I’m very blessed. Sixteen years, still playing in the league, still doing what I’m doing and be the starting point guard for a great organization, that’s a blessing for me.”
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And Spurs coach Gregg Popovich doesn’t seem in any hurry to usher Ginobili to the door, noting that the Argentinean has helped fill the huge leadership void created by Duncan’s retirement. “Manu doesn’t jump as high and he’s not as quick as he used to be, but he is still as smart as he always was,” Popovich said. “His comments during timeouts…have been huge, especially in Timmy’s absence.”
“He’s never going to be a towel waver,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “He speaks to me about things that he sees now. He comes into timeouts, if he’s not happy with what’s going on on the court. That’s all good. “I’d rather have him do that than beat his chest and wiggle his shoulders and stare at the camera and all that other crap,” Pop continued. “That doesn’t seem to make much sense. I’d rather have it the other way and work on him to be a leader in the timeouts, in the locker room, on the plane. That kind of stuff.”