Hubie Brown Rumors

From 1993-94 until now, who are five coaches you have most enjoyed interacting with? Marc Stein: I’m incredibly blessed at ESPN, where I’ve had the chance to work closely with a bunch of great ones. Trying, again, to do this off the top of my head, I’m thinking of Hubie Brown, Rick Carlisle, Avery Johnson, Doug Collins, Mark Jackson, P.J. Carlesimo, Paul Silas, Jeff Van Gundy, George Karl and, of course, Dr. Jack Ramsay, who sadly passed away recently.
Brown, who loves Watson as if he were his own son, said if things materialized in that fashion, he would have to entertain Watson’s proposal, but said it would have to include little, to no traveling due to him getting up there in years. “I’m 80 years old and I’ll be 81 in September, but I wouldn’t mine doing the practices at home,” Brown told CSNNW.com. “You never know what could happen. He is a top professional. He has a high IQ, very coachable and very bright. He doesn’t miss a thing. He’s very inquisitive. He sees things, but picks his spots. I always say that he was one of the toughest kids to ever play for me. He’ll make an excellent NBA head coach.”
If he does decide to retire during the upcoming offseason and is offered a head-coaching gig, the first call he’s going to make is to Hall-of-Fame coach Hubie Brown, offering him a job as his lead assistant. Brown, 80, hasn’t coached since the 2004-05 NBA season and he is currently an accomplished color analyst for ESPN and ABC. Watson, who gets with Brown every summer to steal some plays, believes he’ll have a shot at luring Brown away from the television camera. “I think I can get him out [of retirement]” Watson said. “Just to help me through that first year would be huge. I love him and he loves me.”
“Coach of the year? I’m not sure I want that legacy,” Karl said Wednesday. “Have you seen what happens to guys who win coach of the year?” The award is cursed. Ask any of these winners from the past 10 years. In 2004, Hubie Brown won 50 games with Memphis, but was gone by Thanksgiving of the following season, due to his own poor health or the lousy attitude of his players, take your pick.
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Watson played for Brown for three seasons in Memphis, back when Watson said he “didn’t know anything about the NBA, I was just a blank canvas. His influence has, I guess, cultured me, and made me the man I am today.” The two usually talk about family, Watson said, and basketball. But Watson has more specific things to discuss with Brown these days. “This summer, though, I want to spend time with him in New Jersey so I can get his philosophy on coaching strategy,” Watson said.
The Knicks are getting older on the court but younger in the broadcast booth. Knicks legendary broadcaster John Andariese, a team radio staple for 40 years known around the Garden as “Johnny Hoops,’’ has stepped down from his color analyst position, the Knicks announced Friday. Andariese called the Knicks’ last championship — in 1973 with Marv Albert. Andariese will be replaced by Hubie Brown’s son, Brendan Brown. The Knicks had reduced Andariese’s role last season, having him do just home games.
They celebrated and then they flew. Then they walked into the arena and noticed, “Hey, isn’t that Hubie?” Yes, Hubie Brown! How great to have him on the call for this game. What a perfect narrator for the Memphis franchise’s first-ever appearance on network television. “Any fatigue or soreness I felt, after I talked to Hubie today, that fired me up,” said Shane Battier. “That guy, he’s the greatest. He’s the closest thing that I ever had to a grandpa.”
Since Carmelo Anthony and Chauncey Billups hooked up with Amar’e Stoudemire, assorted mouths have offered multiple reasons why Mike D’Antoni hasn’t gotten the Knicks to jell. Or play defense. Or come out with intensity. Or. . . . Or . . . Or . . . Leave it to Hubie Brown, ESPN’s NBA analyst, to deposit another idea in the think tank – an original reason for this inconsistent play. Get this. Brown thinks “the media” is D’Antoni’s problem. No, Hubie wasn’t going for laughs. The man was dead serious. If we didn’t know better we would have thought Brown, who coached the Knicks from 1982-86, was auditioning for a gig at the MSGulag Network.