James Goldstein Rumors

Goldstein is an eccentric longtime NBA superfan who is seen at all of the NBA’s big events and is regularly courtside at Staples Center. “I’ve known [Noah] a long time, I spoke to him last night,” Goldstein told The Post on Sunday before Team LeBron faced Team Stephen. “I asked him if he was going to be all right, that I’m a little worried about you. He said don’t worry about him, everything’s going to be fine.”
Storyline: New York Knicks Turmoil?
Later on the Western trip, Noah left the club in Denver after a feud with coach Jeff Hornacek, who yanked him during garbage time during a blowout in Golden State on Jan. 23. The next day at practice, according to eyewitnesses, they engaged in a verbal shouting match with Noah being restrained. Hornacek never pushed Noah, according to multiple sources. In fact, indications are the Knicks mulled issuing Noah a suspension for his actions but decided against it. The separation has been called “mutual” by Knicks officials.
Jimmy Goldstein: As the years went by, my attachment to the Hawks waned, but my anti-Lakers sentiment became more firmly entrenched for a number of reasons. First, I usually pull for the underdog in any sports competition, and the Lakers were getting to The Finals or winning championships far too often for me. I like it when a different team becomes a title contender each year. Secondly, I didn’t like it that the Lakers were able to attract so many superstars away from other teams. I like level competition, and the Lakers upset league balance with players like Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Shaquille O’Neal, and many others leaving their teams to live in Los Angeles. (Wilt and I became good friends, and he once told me of his displeasure over my pulling for the opposition, but nothing changed.)
Many fans see me at all the Lakers games and assume I am a huge fan of the Lakers. Almost every day a stranger will approach me and say “Oh, you are the big Lakers fan.” And I respond, “No, I am an anti-Lakers fan.” In amazement they say, “Then why do you go to the games?” They don’t understand that someone can attend because of his love for the game. In recent years, though, more and more people have become aware that I root against the Lakers, the foremost being Laker players and coaches. Most of the players continue to be friendly to me before and after games (Metta World Peace always came over to me at halftime to say hello). They know that I like them on a personal level in spite of my actions during a game.
But there are a few exceptions. Phil Jackson and I were good friends when he was coaching the Bulls. But our friendship cooled when he joined the Lakers. Kobe Bryant even instructed another Laker star, with whom I was quite friendly, not to talk to me. But every now and then, Kobe surprises me by offering a warm hello. Jerry Buss was always extremely nice to me. He used to joke about my anti-Lakers stance. Similarly, many fans rub it in good-naturedly when the Lakers win and I give it back to them when the Lakers lose. But a few fans don’t take my actions lightly, such as the night-club promoter who wouldn’t let me into his club because I was a “Laker hater.”