Jerry Krause Rumors

It seemed as though the dust may have finally settled, with Barkley making a somber declaration of his right to an opinion even as he dropped a couple f-bombs while telling the “haters” what the score was at a nightclub. Meanwhile, the conversation appears ready to continue after former Chicago Bulls GM Jerry Krause told Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski on his podcast that Michael Jordan never made any kind of similar request to LeBron’s. Via Yahoo! (29:30) But I will say one thing for Michael Jordan … never came to me and asked for other players. He never came to me and asked me to draft a player. Never came to me and asked to trade for a player. Never once did that happen. Part of it was he thought he was so darn good he could win without ’em … He understood what we had to do as an organization.
“So I called Michael. We talked about minor-league baseball, North Carolina basketball, and golf. Then we talked about the big deal on the table. Should we do this? “Do it,” he said. “Scottie can make your other players better. Kemp can’t.” So, the day before the draft, we said yes. News of the trade immediately leaked out and onto the KJR airwaves. More anger from the callers, a lot more; our fans loved Shawn. Again, Ackerley listened. That afternoon, he called our draft headquarters in the Sonics locker room. It doesn’t feel right, he told Wally. Better wait. I had the unpleasant job of calling Krause, who was not happy. While we dragged our feet on draft day, Krause got desperate. He called to tell me the Bulls would drop the demand for our number one pick. He offered a big chunk of money in the next call. Then he called back to double it. Literally minutes before the draft started, Ackerley backed us out of the deal. When I delivered the bad news, Krause dropped f-bombs and called me names. We’d keep Kemp, they’d keep Pippen.”
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Reinsdorf credited Collins for his “brilliant” coaching mind, changing the culture of the Bulls and never expressing bitterness for getting fired for Jackson after reaching the 1989 Eastern Conference finals. But Reinsdorf said it was Jackson and former general manager Jerry Krause who helped the Bulls achieve his vision of how basketball should be played. Consistent with his message since receiving word he had been chosen to enter the Hall of Fame, Reinsdorf touted Krause’s Hall of Fame credentials. “I would not be standing here tonight were it not for Jerry Krause,” Reinsdorf said.