Jerry Reinsdorf Rumors

“The entire Bulls organization is deeply saddened by the passing of Jerry Krause,” said Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf. “Jerry was one of the hardest working guys I have ever been around, and he was one of the best talent evaluators ever. Jerry played an integral role in our run of six championships in eight years. He truly was the architect of all our great teams in the ’90s. I would not have been elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame if it were not for Jerry. We will miss him tremendously, and we send our thoughts and prayers to his wife Thelma and the Krause family.”
It’s well-documented that Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf and son Michael, who runs the business side as president and chief operating officer, are loyal and long have favored front-office continuity. But there’s also inherent trust in the roster-building process that Paxson, Forman and their staff have in place.
After hitting on back-end first-rounders Taj Gibson in 2009 and Butler in 2011, Paxson and Forman have drawn outside criticism for recent picks or draft-day acquisitions Nikola Mirotic, Tony Snell, Doug McDermott and Bobby Portis. But the Reinsdorfs still hold management’s talent evaluation in high regard, one source said, and also have valued its ability to avoid hamstringing the franchise with bloated, long-term contracts for players with minimal impact.
The elephant in the room is whether Noah’s contract will haunt Jackson for all four years, considering he already is struggling to find a niche other than rebounding (8.9 per game). The amnesty clause no longer exists and isn’t expected in the new CBA. Noah is 31 and Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf said in September he’s no longer “a front-line center.’’ NBA TV’s Greg Anthony warned about overreacting to Noah’s sluggish start. “I wouldn’t go there,’’ Anthony told The Post. “When you have a unique understanding of the game like he does, he still has a lot of good years left. I’m not yet concerned about him.’’
A shoulder injury limited Noah to 29 games last season. In fact, he’s missed a total of 68 games the last two years. Many league executives feel the Knicks took too big of a risk for a player who, because of his shoulder and leg injuries, no longer has the lateral movement to make an impact defensively. Bulls chairman Jerry Reinsdorf said the team decided not to re-sign Noah because he’s no longer “a front line player.” “He’s entitled to his opinion,’’ Noah said. “I feel I have no regrets about my time in Chicago. I gave it everything I had. To me that’s all that matters.
The Knicks’ $72 million center didn’t think it was beautiful, however, that Bulls longtime owner Jerry Reinsdorf recently said he didn’t believe Noah was “a frontline center’’ any longer. That led to the Bulls trading Derrick Rose to the Knicks and netting Robin Lopez to replace the impending free agent. Noah thought it was “a low blow.’’ “He’s entitled to his opinion,’’ Noah said. “I feel I have no regrets about my time in Chicago. I gave it everything I had. To me that’s all that matters. I did everything I could for that organization. I thought it was a little bit of a low blow, but at the end of the day I have nothing but respect for that organization. I’m just excited for this new chapter of my career.”