Josh Kroenke Rumors

i_e0_46_59_gettyimages-481587458.png
As part of the 2016-17 home-opener festivities, the Denver Nuggets will retire former legend Dikembe Mutombo’s #55 jersey, President and Governor Josh Kroenke announced today. Mutombo was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in September 2015 and will become the fifth player and sixth representative in team history to have his number enshrined in the rafters. He joins fellow Nuggets greats Byron Beck (#40), Alex English (#2), Dan Issel (#44), David Thompson (#33) and Doug Moe, who coached the team to a franchise-record 432 wins. This will mark the first time that the Nuggets have retired a player’s number at Pepsi Center.
Malone said he had input on the deal, acknowledging that he continues to work closely with Connelly, (assistant general manager) Arturas Karnisovas and (president) Josh Kroenke. “We’re a team. There’s no separation between church and state,” Malone said. “We’re together, we’re one, we communicate, and I think that’s so important. But at the end of the day, Tim’s job as GM is to make those decisions, obviously with the blessing of Josh Kroenke. They asked my opinion, I gave it, I tell him what I feel and believe in, and then whatever decision they make I roll with it.”
wpid-i_db_fb_b6_153375937.jpg
Kroenke told Yahoo Sports on Tuesday in a phone interview that the Nuggets had been privately trying to help Lawson with his issues for “the past couple of years” and that there had been problems for a long time. Kroenke said he had repeated conversations with Lawson about his “life struggles,” adding that Lawson often said he would attempt to fix his issues but he could “never fully shake them.”
“He always had an affinity for burning the candle at both ends,” Kroenke said. “We want to give our players freedom to be young guys as well. We’re not going to be drill sergeants. But we want our guys to be able to handle their personal lives on their own. Ty … there were times when he was better than others. But the problems have been there for several years, going back to when we were having a lot of on-court success. I don’t want to go back too far. There were just a lot of times where you were at practice and you just know. You could smell it. You know there is probably deeper issues than he would probably let on.”