Marc Cornstein Rumors

His New York-based agent, Marc Cornstein, told The Post Dalembert will be “a perfect fit’’ and the 6-foot-11 Haitian native out of Seton Hall had always wanted to play in New York. “He was in New York last night and for the last few days and that had nothing to do with the trade,’’ Cornstein said. “He loves the city. It will be a good fit. He gets to New York frequently, does a lot of charitable stuff here.’’
Another source said the possibility exists that Woodson was unhappy with World Peace after a recent practice, in which World Peace spoke up about his playing time, making a wisecrack. World Peace is a constant clown in the locker room, but Woodson took exception. Agent Marc Cornstein said he hasn’t gotten a firm reason why World Peace has seen limited time after the Knicks gave the rest of their mid-level exception in signing the Queenbridge product in July. He has been relegated to mostly garbage time since returning from his platelet-rich plasma procedure. World Peace played the final five minutes of garbage time in Friday night’s rout, as the Knicks fell 117-90 to the Nuggets. “I haven’t been given an answer,’’ Cornstein said. “Usually, I’ll get an answer, not always the one I want to hear. But I don’t have an answer for you on this.’’
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Metta World Peace expressed his hope to remain with the Lakers by exercising his $7.7 million to stay for the 2013-14 season, but he apparently had nothing to do with the decision. The eccentric Lakers forward said he largely delegated the thought process to his agent, Marc Cornstein, in hopes such a move would secure a spot with the team. “He said it was a good chance for me to go out and capitalize off my salary this year,” World Peace said in a phone interview with this newspaper. “I want to go out there, play one more season and then I can be a free agent next season.”
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New York-based basketball player representation firm Pinnacle Management Corp. has signed Los Angeles Lakers forwardMetta World Peace for representation. He will be co-represented by Pinnacle President Marc Cornstein and Doug Davis, who is World Peace’s personal attorney as well as an NBPA-certified agent. World Peace, who went by Ron Artest before changing his name in 2011, was represented byDavid Bauman of Lagardère Unlimited. It was unclear what caused him to switch representation. “We are excited to be representing Metta,” Cornstein said. “He is a great name, and he is having a great season.” World Peace was averaging more than 12 points and five rebounds per game this year in a season that otherwise has been largely disappointing for the Lakers. He suffered a knee injury last Monday, though, and his timetable for return was not immediately known.
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Though Asik won’t sign his three-year, $25.1 million offer sheet until likely Friday, more signs developed that his uniform will have “Rockets” on the front. Marc Cornstein, the agent for Darko Milicic, confirmed the Bulls have expressed interest in his client, who was a recent amnesty cut by the Timberwolves. League sources also indicated the Bulls are casting a wide net for other lower-salaried big men in free agency.
If the Timberwolves are considering using the NBA’s amnesty clause on center Darko Milicic, the matter has not been discussed with Milicic’s agent, Marc Cornstein. Cornstein said Wednesday, July 11, the Wolves have not contacted him regarding the provision in the new collective bargaining agreement that would allow the Wolves to release Milicic without the remainder of his contract, valued at $10.8 million over the next two seasons, counting against the team’s salary cap. “That’s a decision they would have to make,” Corstein said of the Wolves. “I haven’t heard anything from the team about that.”
Marc Cornstein, the New York-based agent for Greek small forward Kostas Papanikolaou, said he expects his client will play for the Knicks in 2013-14, despite a two-year contract with Olympiacos. “He definitely wants to play in the NBA, it’s a lifelong dream of his,’’ Cornstein told The Post. “He’s playing at the highest level in the Greek League and it’s the next step. He’s anxious to play sooner than later. He wanted the right fit with the right team and the Knicks we would’ve handpicked.’’
Papanikolaou has a $1 million buyout in his Greek League contract for that season. The Knicks could pay about $650,000 of the buyout and he would have to foot the rest. Because the NBA minimum is $500,000, it might not be worthwhile financially for Papanikolaou to come over unless the Knicks offered one of their exceptions. It could get complicated. “It’s a manageable buyout,’’ Cornstein countered.
The Milwaukee Bucks are obviously happy to have acquired Samuel Dalembert. The feeling is apparently mutual. Marc Cornstein, Dalembert’s agent, said he had a brief conversation with his client after the veteran center was dealt by Houston to to Milwaukee Wednesday. “He was really excited about going to Milwaukee,’’ Cornstein said. “He’s very familiar with the Bucks’ roster and believes they are headed in the right direction. “It’s always the coach’s decision about playing time, but he believes it’s a fabulous opportunity for him to play there. Like I said, he’s very excited.’’
Greece? You’ll find legitimate NBA players considering Somalia before they entertain offers from the only two teams in Greece that can be players in the game: Olympiakos and Panathinaikos. Those two teams were a combined 57-5 in league play last season. The third place team was 16-10. “It’s ironic,’’ says agent Marc Cornstein of Pinnacle Hoops, who has extensive experience placing players in Europe. “(Olympiakos and Panathinaikos) were in the forefront with Childress and Kleiza. They were very aggressive in the past. But they are lagging because of the economic climate over there. It’s very quiet.”
According to website HoopsHype.com, several players in addition to Williams and Songaila had signed with European teams as of early last week. Still other NBA players are reportedly at least considering overseas deals. While Williams’ deal includes an opt-out in case the NBA lockout ends, Songaila’s does not. Bartelstein said NBA players are convinced there will be a long lockout. Boston Celtics center Nenad Krstic had every intention of exploring the NBA free agent market if not for the lockout, said his agent, Marc Cornstein, president of Pinnacle Management Corp. But when CSKA Moscow came calling, “he got offered a tremendous contract by Moscow,” Cornstein said.
Guys like Brandon Jennings, Andrei Kirilenko, Deron Williams, Trevor Ariza and Kobe Bryant have all expressed interest in playing overseas. Good luck. The reality is, there are not many teams in Europe or elsewhere who will be able to hand out hefty contracts to any player, no matter their NBA credentials. That was part of Krstic’s thinking in bolting the NBA — where he surely would have gotten offers — for Russia. Knowing there are limited spots, Krstic made sure he was occupying one of those places. “I think what a lot of people don’t realize is, you’re going to have a perfect storm of issues here,” Krstic’s agent, Marc Cornstein, told Sporting News. “The economy in Europe is not great, that is a consideration. The lockout here is a big consideration. The bigger teams, like Moscow, are going to be very aggressive early. But beyond that, there are very few teams overseas that are going to be able give lucrative contracts.