Mark Bartelstein Rumors

How the Bucks, Parker and his agent Mark Bartelstein handle Parker’s contract situation remains to be seen. He has said many times over the past three years that he hopes to be the kind of player who spends his whole career with one team. On Monday, he reiterated that Milwaukee is “definitely” where he wants to be, but “at this point, it’s not my choice.” For now, he says he’s staying out of the negotiations. “I have no clue (what’s going on) and that’s why I pay (my agent),” Parker said. “I let them do all the madness.”
Storyline: Jabari Parker Extension?
With salaries having skyrocketed over the summer, thanks in large measure to an extremely lucrative television contract, multiple sources claim Jabari Parker will be seeking a contract similar to the one he expected to receive prior to his latest injury – a max contract of five years for anywhere between $146 million (25 percent of the salary cap) to $175M (30 percent of the cap). It will be perhaps the biggest assignment new Bucks general manager Jon Horst, who had been the team’s director of basketball operations before his shocking promotion to GM, will ever have deal with in his role. It won’t be for Mark Bartelstein, Parker’s new agent. Bartelstein, who heads up Chicago-based Priority Sports and Entertainment, is a longtime agent and regarded as one of the premier agents in sports.
Storyline: Bucks Front Office
“I don’t think they should have smoothed it,” prominent agent Mark Bartelstein said Friday. “It’s easy in hindsight to say that. But I think anytime you’re doing something artificially, I don’t think that’s a good thing. You can open up a hornets’ nest. The idea was the cap should track the revenues, and that’s what the union did. Would it have made things a little more consistent? I wouldn’t have been a fan of smoothing because you’d be doing something artificial. And when you use that word you can have unintended consequences.”
New revenues from sales of advertising patches on the front of team uniforms will come on line in 2017-18; nine teams — Boston, Brooklyn, Cleveland, Minnesota, Orlando, Philadelphia, Sacramento, Toronto and Utah — already have sponsorship patch deals. Detroit’s new downtown arena, Little Caesar’s Arena, will also open next season. “The cap didn’t come in where it was projected,” Bartelstein said. “If the cap would have been at 108 this year, we would have been completely fine without the smoothing. The cap came in at 99. That’s a huge difference. Next year it may go the opposite way — the cap may be $4 or $5 million beyond what is expected. And we’ll get a bounce the other way.”