Masai Ujiri Rumors

During the 2011 NBA lockout and when Ujiri was with the Denver Nuggets, the two had a conversation about the labor dispute. “He knew everything about a lockout,” Ujiri said. “He knew about the CBA (collective bargaining agreement) and BRI (basketball-related income), and you could tell he was following what was going on. He had suggestions. I was actually surprised how much he knew about the CBA.”
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Raptors president Masai Ujiri joined Prime Time Sports on Thursday and revealed that opposing teams have been making inquiries regarding possible deals. “We were busy last week,” Ujiri told Bob McCown and Damien Cox. “There were tons of calls because of the Kyle Korver trade and everybody thought there was another domino coming. There are plenty of calls. That’s the way the NBA works and then all of a sudden it goes quiet.”
With Toronto already boasting one of the best records in the league, Ujiri stressed he and his staff would not settle for a bad deal. If the right trade doesn’t present itself, the Raptors will not force anything just for the sake of making a move. “We find ourselves in a special place, which is second in the East,” Ujiri said. “There is a window with Kyle Lowry, DeMar [DeRozan] and DeMarre [Carroll] with those kind of guys in their prime and we will take advantage. But we’re not making bad deals. It doesn’t help business, it doesn’t help your future. Trust me, if a deal is not made just know there was nothing on the table for us that would really enhance our team.”
Storyline: Raptors Front Office
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The photo was a sea of First Nations faces lit by candles, growing blurrier the further they got from the camera, but something jumped out at Marci Ien. One of the children in the forgiveness circle was wearing a Toronto Raptors hat. She knew Raptors general manager Masai Ujiri a little; she sent him an email. The subject line read, simply, School Shooting. Within seconds, her phone rang. It was Ujiri. How could he help?
“I tell you, those places, it breaks your heart,” says Ujiri. “Because I’ve been to poor places all over the world, whether it’s where Bruno (Caboclo) is from in Brazil, or the slums in Kenya, Kayole or Kibera, or some of the tougher places in Africa. “But the one thing they have, the places I’ve been, there’s a passion for life. You can be as poor as anything but you go to these places and there’s an incredible passion for life. And that includes hope, right? Here, you look at the faces, and you wish you can create — you wish you can help them create that passion for life. Because you can see it lacking there, a little bit. And I hate to say it like that.”