Michael Wilbon Rumors

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The characterization, which set off alarm bells on both coasts, came on the heels of Magic Johnson’s abrupt departure from Countdown, which the piece reported was the result of a power struggle between Simmons and Johnson. Simmons vehemently denies that accusation, insisting that Johnson left, in large part, because of ESPN’s mishandling of Michael Wilbon, a former Countdown co-host and close Johnson pal, on the show. That it was being positioned any other way set Simmons off. “I was f*ing furious,” he says. “I was yelling at everybody. I was like, ‘What the f*? You guys f*ed this up. Why am I in this?’ And I just made it worse. I should’ve just not said anything and used that to my advantage for the next thing.”
In addition to signing a contract extension with ESPN, Sage Steele has accepted the host’s role for the network’s “NBA Countdown” pregame show. Steele replaces Michael Wilbon, who will focus more on his “Pardon The Interruption” show. She will work the Friday and Sunday editions on the shown on ESPN and ABC. Returning analysts Jalen Rose and Bill Simmons will be joined by new hire Doug Collins.
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Michael Wilbon’s role on ESPN’s NBA Countdown will be diminished next season, and taking his spot on the set will most likely be former 76ers coach Doug Collins, multiple sources told The Big Lead. The move is primarily so that Wilbon can return to focusing on the show that made him a star, Pardon the Interruption. In recent years, Wilbon has increasingly appeared on PTI via remote – from Chicago, Miami, Los Angeles, Arizona, etc – diluting some of the outstanding chemistry he’s built up with longtime friend Tony Kornheiser.
Michael Wilbon’s role on ESPN’s NBA Countdown will be diminished next season, and taking his spot on the set will most likely be former 76ers coach Doug Collins, multiple sources told The Big Lead. The move is primarily so that Wilbon can return to focusing on the show that made him a star, Pardon the Interruption. In recent years, Wilbon has increasingly appeared on PTI via remote – from Chicago, Miami, Los Angeles, Arizona, etc – diluting some of the outstanding chemistry he’s built up with longtime friend Tony Kornheiser.
I know you’re already read it, but here’s Michael Wilbon’s final column for The Washington Post. It was finely done. As he’s said and written before, he found the final piece to be a depressing thing, saying it was the first column he “ever dreaded writing,” and that the end “will be far more traumatic to me, I suspect, than to you.” That was on Tuesday. Wednesday morning, ESPN sent out a press release announcing that Wilbon would be a “featured columnist” for ESPNChicago.com, and will also be making weekly appearances on ESPN Radio 1000 in “his beloved hometown.” His first ESPNChicago.com column and chat were scheduled for Wednesday. (Here’s the column.) This would be the traumatic part for us.