Mitt Romney Rumors

Axelrod stuffs his hands in the pockets of his blazer and walks the short block back to the Institute of Politics. Inside, the floors are covered in the salt stains of a hundred student boots. The institute, which hosts an impressive slate of speakers from both parties, including, in April, Mitt Romney, is something of an ad hoc museum, filled with Axelrod’s collection of American political artifacts. In the front hall is a glass-encased ballot box from the Florida 2000 presidential election. There’s also a napkin signed by JFK, a letter from the newly elected Abraham Lincoln to the Chicago mayor’s son, and a signed poster of Michael Jordan. “When the president turned 50, I wanted to get him something special … so I sent it to Jordan to have him sign it for me.” In black Sharpie, Jordan scrawled, “To Barrack: you still owe me dinner. Wishing you well, Michael Jordan.” “I gave it to the president, and he said, ‘I can’t put this up, he misspelled my name!’ So I said, ‘Fine, I’ll take it.’ ” His own office is a special exhibit dedicated to his time in politics — a program from a State of the Union speech, a ticket to the Nobel Prize ceremony, an invite to Obama’s swearing-in as senator, with the words HERE BECAUSE OF YOU! written in the president’s script.
When Pat Riley last visited the White House to mark the Miami Heat’s 2006 championship, he told President and Republican George W. Bush he had voted for him. So what’s the Miami Heat president going to tell President and Democrat Barack Obama on Monday when his team again visits the White House? “Here’s how I am about that,’’ said Riley, who Friday wouldn’t reveal his vote in last November’s election although it has been reported he donated $7,500 to Mitt Romney’s campaign. “Regardless of what I am, he’s the leader and that’s it. He’s the boss and I’m right behind him. And it doesn’t make any difference. And that’s how I feel about it. And so I’ll shake his hand with as much enthusiasm and hope for the best. That’s the way it is in this country. That’s how I feel about it.’’
Dwight Howard, Ryan Lochte and Gregg Williams were among the 25 men and women named to GQ’s list of the least influential people of 2012. Mitt Romney, Amanda Bynes and Madonna headlined the group that featured other sports figures like New York Knicks owner James Dolan, former Boston Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine and disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong. Howard was cited for the lengthy trade discussions that made “every American [hate his guts],” though that probably overstates how many people cared about Howard’s trade status. Williams made it because he’s “the rare person stupid enough to deserve being scapegoated.” Dolan: “Does he have some kind of “stubborn [expletive]” gene that the rest of us lack?