Moses Malone Rumors

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James needs a basket to surpass Malone (27,409 points) as the eighth leading scorer in history. Way, way back when, on Oct. 29, 2003, to be precise, on the afternoon of James’ first game as a pro, in Sacramento, Malone joined James in his hotel room for a pre-game meal and chat that James remembers today. “Just talked about what it’s like to be a rookie in the league,” James said before the Cavs’ morning shootaround in Milwaukee. “He gave me a bunch of stories, and so it was very sad when I seen him pass.
Barkley was asked about it on SportsCenter — is this true? And Barkley confirmed: Williams was telling the truth. Chuck says: “That’s the truth. When I got to Philadelphia, Dr. J, Moses Malone, Maurice Cheeks—they never practiced. They’d sit on the side, on the stationary bike, eating McDonald’s. So once I had been in the league X amount of years, I adopted that philosophy. I had played 48 minutes the night before, I wasn’t going to get up the next morning and go to practice.”
Both members of that starting backcourt — Dennis Johnson and Danny Ainge — suffered heart attacks. Ainge had his at age 50 and survived; DJ, at age 52, did not. Add Kevin McHale’s now permanently impaired foot and Bird’s and Walton’s struggles, and the nucleus of one of the greatest teams of all time is, 30 years later, deeply damaged goods.’ Bird, who turned 59 in December, says more research is clearly needed. “I have my own philosophies on that,” Bird says. “Guys that played the hardest in the league — big guys who ran their asses off — they are the ones in the most danger, I feel. Moses was one of those competitors. We build our hearts up when we are playing and then we quit performing at a high level, and our hearts just sit there. I don’t work out like I used to. I can’t. I can’t go out and run. I jog and have a little sauna, that’s about it. My body won’t let me do more than that.”