Real Estate Rumors

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As the Clippers continue to jockey for position in the NBA’s Western Conference, center DeAndre Jordan has executed an off-court play, selling his home in Pacific Palisades for $11.75 million — about $1 million less than he paid for it a year ago. The Cape Cod-inspired mansion, built in 2014, has 10,500 square feet of living space, including a home theater with 130-inch screen, indoor exercise pool, elevator and gym. There’s even a secret room accessed by thumbprint entry system.
Storyline: Real Estate
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After three stints with the Heat, including joining the team as the No. 2 pick in the 2008 NBA draft, Beasley, 27, appreciates the winds of change amid what has become life as a journeyman scorer. That especially hit home after the Houston Rockets guaranteed his contract for this season on August 1. A month later, he was dealt to the Bucks, who were in search of scoring in the wake of the hamstring injury to guard Khris Middleton. “I literally just bought a house,” the 6-foot-9 forward said of the comfort of establishing roots in Houston after a strong finish to last season. “Literally the day before I got traded, I just got my Wi-Fi, my cable set up. And you know how important that is.”
Storyline: Real Estate
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Iguodala said he joined the Warriors in 2013 not only because it was a team on the rise, but also because of its proximity to Silicon Valley tech companies, especially startup investing. Now he wants his basketball peers to seek similar interests. “I’m just trying to get my colleagues to understand that there is a space for us outside of our normal investing,” he said. “You normally see [players investing in] the barbershop. You see the music companies. You see a lot of real estate. You don’t see many go outside of their comfort zones. “We want to change that.”
2 months ago via CNET
And that’s what also prompted Iguodala and Cline Thomas to help create the National Basketball Players Association’s inaugural tech summit, which brought together current and former NBA players to network with key tech execs in San Francisco in July. Iguodala used his leverage as a vice president for the players’ union to make it happen. More than 30 players participated in the three-day event, they said. Many players came prepared like astute businessmen as they and the tech execs peppered each other with plenty of questions. “The response was amazing,” said Iguodala, converting some skeptics. “A lot of them, said, ‘Wow, we didn’t know what you meant?'” Cline Thomas added, “Some players are already investing. All it took was some exposure.”
2 months ago via CNET