Real Estate Rumors

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After three stints with the Heat, including joining the team as the No. 2 pick in the 2008 NBA draft, Beasley, 27, appreciates the winds of change amid what has become life as a journeyman scorer. That especially hit home after the Houston Rockets guaranteed his contract for this season on August 1. A month later, he was dealt to the Bucks, who were in search of scoring in the wake of the hamstring injury to guard Khris Middleton. “I literally just bought a house,” the 6-foot-9 forward said of the comfort of establishing roots in Houston after a strong finish to last season. “Literally the day before I got traded, I just got my Wi-Fi, my cable set up. And you know how important that is.”
Storyline: Real Estate
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Iguodala said he joined the Warriors in 2013 not only because it was a team on the rise, but also because of its proximity to Silicon Valley tech companies, especially startup investing. Now he wants his basketball peers to seek similar interests. “I’m just trying to get my colleagues to understand that there is a space for us outside of our normal investing,” he said. “You normally see [players investing in] the barbershop. You see the music companies. You see a lot of real estate. You don’t see many go outside of their comfort zones. “We want to change that.”
2 weeks ago via CNET
And that’s what also prompted Iguodala and Cline Thomas to help create the National Basketball Players Association’s inaugural tech summit, which brought together current and former NBA players to network with key tech execs in San Francisco in July. Iguodala used his leverage as a vice president for the players’ union to make it happen. More than 30 players participated in the three-day event, they said. Many players came prepared like astute businessmen as they and the tech execs peppered each other with plenty of questions. “The response was amazing,” said Iguodala, converting some skeptics. “A lot of them, said, ‘Wow, we didn’t know what you meant?'” Cline Thomas added, “Some players are already investing. All it took was some exposure.”
2 weeks ago via CNET
The money Gods have answered Gilbert Arenas’ prayers — because just days after he claimed he couldn’t afford private school for his kids … the ex-NBA star made a cool $600k in a real estate deal. TMZ Sports has learned … Gilbert sold his Calabasas mansion for $3.35 mil — which is GREAT, considering he bought the place in 2013 for $2.75. Gilbert and Laura Govan initially lived in the home together — but he gave her the boot after they split up in 2014. Gilbert claims he now lives in a nearby apartment.
Storyline: Real Estate
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One of the best properties in all of Los Angeles just sold … for a cool $100 mil, TMZ has learned. Detroit Pistons’ owner Tom Gores snagged the Holmby Hills estate Thursday. The place is spectacular … 30,000 square feet, 10 bedrooms, 20 bathrooms, a 10 car garage, ridiculous pools, including an indoor waterfall that drops into a lap pool, beauty salon, wine room, massage room, movie theater … and on and on. The master suite alone is 5,300 square feet!
Storyline: Real Estate
Even Jeremy Lin lives in Brooklyn now. New York’s professional athletes have long gravitated to luxury Manhattan high-rises, trendy TriBeCa lofts and sprawling mansions on the Hudson. Not since there was baseball at Ebbets Field and the old Dodgers had homes in Bay Ridge have players chosen to actually live in Brooklyn. But that has all changed in recent months. The Nets are playing, practicing and, at long last, living in Brooklyn this season. In fact, 12 of the 15 players with guaranteed contracts are bona fide residents, a stark change from last season when the team was still practicing in East Rutherford, N.J., and only one player lived in the borough. This season, some players reside within a bounce pass of the fetid Gowanus Canal, a Superfund site. Their real estate decisions are the latest proof that this ain’t your father’s Brooklyn — unless your father cultivated roof-to-table microgreens and ran a small-batch bourbon distillery/yarn store. “It’s different,” said Luis Scola, a forward from Argentina whose family has a three-bedroom rental in Carroll Gardens. “You walk places. We’re riding our bikes a lot. It’s a place with real personality.”