Rick Carlisle Rumors

“This is a fact: There’s no player that comes into this that can be totally prepared to play defense in the NBA with the pace, the strength difference, the speed difference and all those kinds of things. But I think Dennis understands that staying on the court to do that means you’ve got to be strong in both areas,” Mavs coach Rick Carlisle said of Smith’s defensive abilities earlier this summer. “It’s important to attack the guy that’s going to be attacking you at the other end, but you’ve got to be able to guard him, too. And you’ve got to have a system in place where your teammates can help you do that, so that’s going to be one of the biggest parts of his learning curve. You know, I expect the offensive stuff to happen pretty naturally just based on what I’ve seen on film, but NBA defense is a different metabolic situation. There’s a lot to learn, and he understands that.
Last season, the Mavs pulled down just 38.6 rebounds a game as a team, ranking 30th out of 30 squads while allowing opponents to grab 44.5 boards an outing. The Mavericks grabbed just 7.9 offensive boards per game as well, which also ranked 30th in the league. And after seeing his team collect only 30.7 defensive boards a game to finish the ’16-17 season, Carlisle admits that rebounding will be more of a focus of the squad when training camp gets underway in late September. “Rebounding is a big challenge. It’s been a big challenge for us all year, so we’re going to have to do a better job than we’ve done from top to bottom,” Carlisle confessed last season. “Rebounding is a big key. There’s no doubt. Pursuing the ball is one of the big keys to this game.
“I don’t believe it’s a fluke,” Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle said. “In the last few years, I believe that ownership really has seen the value of great coaching. And put a higher value on it. “Contracts have gotten stronger. Length of contracts has gotten better for coaches. There’s no doubt that in today’s NBA, ownership understands the importance of continuity and staying the course. They deserve a lot of credit for finding their way to this point.”
He’s a self-taught pianist who has performed in many packed concert venues, which brings about a different form of pressure. And he’s now a licensed pilot on the brink of achieving his instrument rating. Carlisle understands the pressure in aviation literally can come with life-and-death consequences. Asked what he thought about his coach being a part-time pilot, Mavs owner Mark Cuban replied, “I hope he’s a good one.”
3 weeks ago via ESPN
There were practical reasons for Carlisle to pursue his pilot’s license and buy a plane, such as the desire to visit his parents more often. They live in Ogdensburg, New York, near the Canadian border, a trip that requires two flights and a two-hour drive if traveling commercially — an all-day ordeal. In his plane, Carlisle can make a direct flight and a five-minute drive to his folks’ farm. Carlisle used to typically make only one trip per year to visit his parents. He visited them four times this offseason.
3 weeks ago via ESPN