Roland Beech Rumors

Beech’s beginnings in basketball statistical analysis date to 2002-03, when he built the website 82games.com. With NBA box scores available to the public, Beech wanted to learn about the game and how it was played. The website intrigued Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban. “Mark Cuban found it within two weeks,” Beech said. “He was one of the first hundred or so people to find the site. So he loved it and we got to talking. And a few years later, I started consulting with the team, and after a few years of that, I came into Dallas full time as part of the whole staff. It was how I got in for sure.”
On Kings players he’s looking forward to working with “Obviously DeMarcus Cousins is a franchise player, an MVP-caliber guy no doubt. So it’s exciting to have someone like that on the team. Ben [McLemore] is a really young guy and in Dallas, we didn’t really have any sort of player development since we were a pretty strong team so we were always trying to win and play the veterans more so than developing the young guys. So it’s nice to have a guy like Ben who’s already had two years of developing but is still so young.”
“I think [Rajon Rondo] can do very well here. I always preach that fit matters so much, which differs from people who obsess about the stats. You can rate guys, but so much is about how they fit with different players and coaching schemes. The story I’ve told other people about is at the end of last season in pre-game, [Rondo] was actually going one-on-one with Dwight Powell, trying to drive on him and finish and Dwight’s like 6-foot-10, a big guy, so I really like that.
The Sacramento Kings have come to terms with Roland Beech to hire the longtime NBA sabermatrician to head up their analytics department, according to league sources. Sources told ESPN.com that Beech is poised to join the Kings as their vice president of analytics under Vlade Divac, Sacramento’s new head of basketball operations. Beech will thus fill a void created after another of the league’s foremost analytics experts — Dean Oliver — recently left the organization.