Ron Adams Rumors

Once the Erman departure becomes official, Stevens will need to replace a talented assistant for the second consecutive offseason. Long-time veteran Ron Adams left for Golden State last summer. “I’ve done it pretty much every summer I’ve been a coach,” Stevens said. “If you’ve got a good staff, you’re going to lose them at times. And that’s great. It’s great for the opportunity for upward mobility for your staff and for your environment. I think that’s a positive feel when guys get a chance to move on, grow, and do other things. I think that’s all good.”
Steph does a lot of great things to help this team win aside from the scoring. The scoring is pivotal obviously, but he does a lot of great things. His defense has really, really improved. He knows when he doesn’t do well defensively this is important. He wants to do better, he works on getting better. That’s just an instance of leadership and you’re always trying to prod people to lead more.
-Q: More vocal? -ADAMS: Vocal. And physically. I said, ‘Because what you do is a barometer for the rest of the team, without any question.’ Now, I wasn’t down on how he was practicing; I think he’s a good practice player. But I want him to see and continually see what his affect on others is. And he understands that. He has a lot on his plate. And I’m careful about that, too, because I don’t think the public understands the pressure on people who can score the ball and if you don’t score the ball it’s like the end of the world. And it’s not the end of the world.
Ron Adams: Steph in his own way can and has. And I want more from him in that regard. I mentioned to him the other day in defensive drills, he’s quite good about always doing his share. He’s a good practice guy. Both Klay and Steph are good practice players. And as the two flagship players, that filters down to everyone else; it’s important. But I just told him after a defensive sequence, I said, ‘You always do a good job in these drills; you take it seriously, you go through it well. But I’d like you lead more in them. I’d like you to be more exuberant.’
Kerr’s first move spoke volumes: He assembled a first-class coaching staff, with lieutenants (Alvin Gentry and Ron Adams) who were better versed than him in critical aspects of the game. He never felt threatened by the players’ fondness for former coach Mark Jackson and allowed them to keep several traditions from the Jackson era. He gained Curry’s trust, inspired disillusioned center Andrew Bogut, managed David Lee’s reduced role and convinced veteran Andre Iguodala, a longtime NBA starter, to come off the bench. “You’re a huge reason why we’re here today,” Curry said as he turned to Kerr during the MVP acceptance speech. “Thanks very much for being you.”
Sam Smith: Since Ron Adams was let go as an assistant, I know the Bulls have begged Thibodeau to add someone to run the offense, or at least be an offensive mind to work with. Thibodeau has declined. He likes to run the offense, too, and the issue to me has been less a predictable offense—how many NBA offenses are so creative? LeBron posting up? Harden dribbling all over?—than Thibodeau being so hands on and calling so many plays, which I’ve long felt inhibits the flow. I’ve always been one who’d rather see the players make more calls, push the ball in transition, swing the ball. That’s the reason for the droughts: Late shot clocks with deliberate play in too many play calls. It’s why the triangle is a good offense. It requires players to make more decisions. They should, and the good ones can.