Showbusiness Rumors

Emmy Award winning multimedia production company OBB Pictures announced Tuesday the Nov. 2 premiere of “The 5th Quarter” — a 12-episode mockumentary comedy series that will feature NBA stars Blake Griffin, Karl-Anthony Towns and Chandler Parsons, as well as comedians George Lopez and Jeff Ross and sportscasters Kenny Mayne and Ahmad Rashad. The series will be available for free exclusively on or the go90 app. A new episode will be released every Wednesday.
The NBA doesn’t think it makes sense to give fans streaming games on a smartphone the exact same vantage point as people watching at home on a large TV screen. So for every game of the upcoming season, it’s offering a new option for NBA League Pass customers: Mobile View, a zoomed-in video feed that provides a tighter perspective of whatever’s happening on the court. Beginning tomorrow, Mobile View will appear as a third option alongside the typical home and away feeds when in League Pass. So if you don’t have any trouble following the action on your phone’s screen and prefer the traditional TV experience, you can stick with that. Mobile View is available on both phones and tablets, but not League Pass apps designed for TVs.
The NBA, the first major sports league to really embrace virtual reality, is getting even more serious about the technology for the upcoming 2016–2017 season. Today NBA Digital and its partner NextVR announced that they’ll broadcast at least one game every week during the season in VR, complete with dedicated announcers, multiple camera angles, and VR-optimized graphics. Fans will need to have a full-season NBA League Pass subscription — either purchased directly or through a cable provider — to watch games in virtual reality. VR games can be viewed using Samsung’s Gear VR and the NextVR app. The NBA says that other VR headsets will be supported later in the season. During game breaks, fans will be able to see in-venue entertainment and behind-the-scenes arena footage.
Patrick Patterson: Please, please, Hollywood, I’m pleading with you, do not make Space Jam 2. The past couple of years, more and more rumors have been swirling about a Space Jam sequel. I’ve seen a lot of speculation over who will star in it, when it will be released and what the plot might be. So now, as an NBA player, movie lover and grown man who has a Looney Tunes painting proudly hanging in his home, I feel it’s time for me to finally take a stand. I’m a huge movie fan. Movies are a big part of my life. This summer I even had the opportunity to help cover the Toronto International Film Festival for the CBC. So please know that I don’t say this lightly: The original Space Jam is the perfect movie. The. Perfect. Movie.
Patrick Patterson: I think the reason the original Space Jam was so amazing was that it had absolutely no business being good. I’m a professional athlete, and I think most sports movies suck, particularly the ones that cast athletes in starring roles. It’s just a fact. But for some reason, by using like random aliens as a connector, this film about Looney Tunes characters and an assortment of semiprominent-to-prominent ’90s NBA stars just … worked. It captivated you. It felt like … it actually happened. Every sports fan has watched their team slumping and in the back of their mind thought, Damn, wonder if the Monstars took their powers. It seemed so real that the most unrealistic part of the entire movie was the suggestion that Michael Jordan lived in a modest two-story home at the peak of his stardom.