Sneakers Rumors

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After leaving Nike for ANTA back in February, Golden State Warriors sharpshooter Klay Thompson is preparing for his first full season as a member of the China-based brand. When he returns to the court this fall, he’ll do so wearing his very first signature sneaker. Thompson and ANTA officially introduced the KT1 (working name) earlier today. Styled in Dub Nation colors, the high-top features a uniquely textured upper, heel overlay, printed interior and anatomical map outsole traction pattern. There’s also a Golden State Warriors logo on the tongue of this pair, a benefit of the deal signed by the brand to become the NBA’s official partner and merchandiser in China last year.
via Sole Collector
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Michael Jordan has been forced to wait an extra day before jurors begin deliberating in his federal court case against defunct supermarket chain Dominick’s. U.S. District Judge John Blakey delayed closing arguments at the end of the six-day trial until Friday morning. Both sides finished presenting evidence Wednesday, but Blakey decided he needed Thursday to oversee arguments about the instructions he will give jurors. Dominick’s was previously found liable by the court for using Jordan’s name and identity without permission in a 2009 special issue of Sports Illustrated. Jurors must decide how much Dominick’s owner Safeway must pay for the gaffe. Jordan and his advisers say the rights Dominick’s took without permission were worth $10 million, but an expert hired by Dominick’s put the fair price at just $126,900.
via Chicago Tribune
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Forget the $10 million Michael Jordan says the use of his name and identity is worth — it’s only worth $126,900, a sports economics expert hired by the defunct supermarket chain Dominick’s testified in federal court Wednesday morning. Rodney Fort, a University of Michigan professor of sports management, said Jordan and his advisers wildly overestimated the value of a single-page ad in a 2009 special issue of Sports Illustrated in which Dominick’s used Jordan’s name and identity without permission. The fair market value of the one-time use of Jordan’s identity “could be no more than $126,900,” Fort testified.
via Chicago Tribune