Tate George Rumors

A federal judge on Friday rejected jailed former NBA player Tate George’s appeal of his 2013 fraud conviction, ruling that the government provided ample evidence for a jury to find him guilty of running a real estate Ponzi scheme. George was convicted last fall on four wire fraud counts during a trial in which current and former athletes testified that they lost money investing in projects he touted. “I find the evidence presented during the government’s case in chief was by all means sufficient,” U.S. District Judge Mary L. Cooper said.
As University of Connecticut basketball legend Tate George reaches the one-year anniversary of his imprisonment Tuesday, prosecutors are blasting him in court papers over his request that a federal judge overturn his four felony convictions. George was convicted by a federal jury of four counts of wire fraud last year in connection with running a Ponzi scheme to defraud investors, including former UConn star Charlie Villaneuva, and prosecutors said he could as much as six to nine years in prison.
A former NBA player best known for his 1990 tournament buzzer-beater for Connecticut is on trial this week in Trenton, N.J., on federal charges of wire fraud. Tate George is accused of carrying out a Ponzi scheme from 2005 to early 2011, netting him $2 million. He has denied wrongdoing. Prosecutors say George used money investors sank into his purported real estate firm to pay previous investors or for home improvements and personal expenses.
Charlie Villanueva had to tell the truth, he said. The Detroit Pistons power forward was talking about a trial in which former NBA player Tate George was convicted Monday of bilking $2 million in a Ponzi scheme, with Villanueva, who testified last month, one of his victims. “I don’t care how much money you make, 250K is 250K,” Villanueva said of his losses in the scam perpetrated by a fellow former University of Connecticut player. He said he felt more sympathy for other victims than for himself, like a woman who inherited $46,000 and lost it all investing with George. “She needed that 46K,” Villanueva said.
Former NBA point guard Tate George has been convicted of wire fraud after a federal jury found that he ran a $2 million Ponzi scheme that ensnared fellow athletes. George, 45, played for the Nets and Bucks during an unremarkable four-year NBA career and was better known as a collegiate player at Connecticut. He was taken into federal custody in New Jersey after the conviction on Monday and faces up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 on each of four wire fraud counts. Sentencing was scheduled for January, 2014.