Tim Donaghy Rumors

Donaghy says the white gang wanted to initiate him with a prison tattoo — involving a pin and ink from a pen — but he managed to talk the guys into “option #2″ … a shaved head. “It was a matter of me surviving, and getting the f**k outta there” … Donaghy says. T.D. says he owes his life to one of the leaders … a guy nicknamed “St. Pete” … “Thank God I teamed up with him. He saved my life. There’s no doubt about it, I never would’ve survived if it weren’t for St. Pete.”
via TMZ.com
Ex-NBA ref Tim Donaghy tells TMZ Sports he owes his life to the leader of a white prison gang … saying he would’ve been murdered behind bars if not for their protection. Donaghy was infamously sentenced to 15 months of hard time back in ’08 for his role in an NBA gambling scandal. While locked up, the ex-ref says he was brutally attacked by a fellow inmate. “I was a target. There was a guy who took a paint roller extension pole and blasted me in the knee a few times,” Donaghy tells TMZ Sports. “I had to have surgery to relieve the pain when I got out of prison.”
via TMZ.com
Flagg responded to the tweet by doing an interview on a Dallas radio show, then reaching out and telling me of Cuban, “He called. I don’t lie.” Flagg called into my Portland radio show (Line 1) and re-told the story, indicating that their discussion was prior to the publication of Tim Donaghy’s book. Flagg said Cuban asked, “What’s in the book?” Flagg said that he spoke with Cuban about the 2006 Finals, and that he told him to sue the NBA. Flagg said he agreed with Cuban that he was not paid for his advice.
via Oregonian
Flagg was later hired by the Donaghy defense team to run an independent investigation of the league’s officiating. He said the NBA’s refusal to release its internal investigation during Donaghy’s prosecution in 2008 still troubles him. “They wanted this thing to be closed,” Flagg said, “and their story was that Tim was the only bad apple. I’ve never seen a cooperating witness so hammered and badgered. It was because the NBA was running the thing. “I would like to see if (the NBA) did what it did a few years earlier when the refs were picked up for selling their first-class airline tickets. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure that out. I’ll bet they did. In that case, they (turned the officials against each other using the threat of termination). They said, ‘If you want to work, tell us what happened.’ If that Donaghy internal investigation ever gets leaked, it’s going to be like the performance-enhancing drug investigation in baseball.”
via Oregonian
Donaghy, who was excommunicated by the league after his conviction for wire fraud and transmitting betting information about games,then contacted the News and fired back with charges of hypocrisy. “I laugh at the idea that the NBA conveniently uses my felony conviction to routinely dismiss me,” Donagy said. “The NBA need look no further than some of the men on their own payroll to find felons. In fact, Don Vaden, the current Director of Officials, is a fine example (Vaden was one of eight referees charged with tax evasion in 1998 for downgrading first-grade plane tickets and not reporting the refunded money. He was found guilty and served six months’ of home confinement and two years of probation.).
via New York Daily News
Why would the NBA want the Nets to advance? Donaghy says it’s all about television ratings. “In this situation, Brooklyn would be put at an advantage. A Brooklyn-Miami matchup (in Round 2) would bring great ratings and that’s what this is all about for the NBA and the league offices — bringing in as many dollars as they can. … Some of the things that the league does and continues to do puts these teams at a disadvantage — like the Toronto Raptors — because moving forward they won’t bring in the big dollars for the league. It’s terrible for the fans (of) Toronto. They go and support that team but really they’re going to have trouble moving on based on talent and what takes place on the floor when they’re really going against the refs and the league, along with the Nets.”
via FOXSports.com
The judge had ordered Donaghy to end his employment last month with the Philadelphia-based radio show “Sports Connection” upon disclosures that the show’s host, “Danny Burelli,” wasn’t who he said he was. Donaghy’s probation officer discovered that the host was in fact Daniel Biancullo, who has a 2004 federal conviction in Florida for gambling and a 1991 conviction in New Jersey for cocaine possession. Donaghy claimed he was clueless about Biancullo’s past, according to court papers.
via New York Daily News
Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Goldberg, who prosecuted Donaghy’s case in Brooklyn, declined to comment on Donaghy’s current activities. Donaghy said the job has been “good so far,” and that he doesn’t “have the urge to go back” to gambling, even when a game pans out exactly the way he’d predicted — which makes money for Biancullo’s clients. “I still feel, at times, that I can predict these games,” said Donaghy, who previously worked at a gambling treatment center before signing up with Biancullo.
via Philadelphia Inquirer
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Like a recovering alcoholic tending bar for his old drinking buddies, the ex-NBA referee has been breaking down game tape and analyzing point spreads for a shady sports handicapper in Allentown known as “Danny B,” who uses the information to sell gambling tips to his clients. “Meet the man who generated millions of dollars betting on basketball, as seen on 60 Minutes and documented by the NBA and FBI,” Danny B.’s website, sportsconnectionwins.com, says of Donaghy. “It’s basically a consulting firm,” said Donaghy, 45, who’s still on probation for gambling on basketball games and providing picks to two co-defendants while he was an active referee. He resigned in 2007 after 13 years in the league and pleaded guilty to federal gambling and wire-fraud charges in New York. He served about 13 months in prison.
via Philadelphia Inquirer
After 5 rough years that included banishment from the NBA, gambling and wire-fraud convictions for betting on basketball games, and even 2 weeks spent in solitary confinement “like Charles Manson” while serving a 15-month prison term, Donaghy can finally put one in the win column. According to Donaghy and his lawyer, a St. Petersburg jury on Friday awarded Donaghy $1.3 million in his civil suit against Shawna Vercher and her now-defunct company VTi Group, which published Donaghy’s tell-all book about the NBA and its referees. “The lady made my life a living hell and basically tortured me through the press by putting fictitious stories out there,” Donaghy said Sunday. “I knew, at some point, my time would come. And my time was Friday.”
via Philadelphia Inquirer
In the wake of their Game 2 overtime loss to the Miami Heat, many Boston Celtics fans grew livid at several bad calls that helped decide the game. In particular, this Rajon Rondo missed lay-up involved a pretty clear foul by Dwyane Wade, but the Heat ended up converting at the other end to take a four-point lead. Those fans are still upset. So, to show displeasure at Friday night’s Game 3, they’re going to wear masks of Tim Donaghy, the referee who admitted to betting on games and acting as part of an illegal gambling ring.
via Yahoo! Sports
Donaghy recently republished the book himself and says it’s now up to its fifth printing. He reports getting positive e-mails from all over the country after people read it, which mirrors the positive reception he gets around the Sarasota and Bradenton communities. But one of his biggest surprises is how little has changed in the NBA since he blew his whistle on the action off the court. “I thought there was going to be an enormous amount of change in the NBA,” he said. “The NBA came out and said everyone plays under the same set of rules.”
via WTSP.com
But Donaghy, who underwent court-mandated treatment for his gambling addiction after serving most of a 15-month prison sentence, says he’s toeing a fine line rather than going down a slippery slope. “It’s different (than what I was convicted for) because I’m not placing bets now,” Donaghy said. “I realize in the past that I couldn’t gamble responsibly. It’s something that caused a lot of damage in my life and the lives of my daughters. So, it’s something I’m not going to go back to.” Donaghy was making actual predictions for Berrelli and says he was nearly perfect late in the NBA season until his probation officer told him to stop. So now he just advises Berrelli on how he can advise his clients. “It’s a situation where I can always look back and see the destruction (gambling) caused,” Donaghy said, mentioning his damaged relationship with his four daughters. “So, I’m going to be very careful moving forward.”
via WTSP.com