Drummond started the third quarter, but the NBA’s leading rebounder wasn’t the same in the second half. He went 6 for 11 from the field in the first half and 0 for 3 in the second. “We just tried to be physical,” Middleton said of the Bucks’ plan for Drummond. “We know he doesn’t like contact. Once he misses a couple, he is going to get down on himself and start forcing tough shots. Greg did a great job of just making him shot tough shots and not letting him get to his right hand.”
The Detroit Pistons announced today that the club will honor and retire jerseys for Ben Wallace and Chauncey Billups during the 2015-16 season. Wallace will be honored during a halftime ceremony on Saturday, January 16 at 7:30 p.m. when the Pistons host the Golden State Warriors at The Palace of Auburn Hills. Billups will be honored during a halftime ceremony on Wednesday, February 10 at 7:30 p.m. when Detroit squares off against the Denver Nuggets at The Palace. “Our franchise has an extraordinary history and it’s important that we recognize the players who not only achieved great things, but also helped define what it means to be a Piston,” said Pistons Owner Tom Gores. “Chauncey Billups and Ben Wallace are legends in Detroit and we are excited to honor their success.”
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Storyline: Uniforms
Gores said Wallace and Billups both embodied the spirit and determination of the Detroit community. “While we celebrate their individual accomplishments, it was their selflessness that helped make them so special,” said Gores. “They showed up every day willing to work and sacrifice for the good of the team. They put winning above all else and in the process inspired a generation of Pistons fans.”
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There were too many flagrant fouls, though. He was, he admits, “dysfunctional in the locker room.” And, of course, he was at the center of the 2004 “Malice at the Palace” brawl against the Detroit Pistons when he played for the Pacers, a reputation-staining incident that he’ll almost certainly never shake. For as good as he was, World Peace was just as volatile and, as a result, he never played with any team longer than five years. “I had to play on other people’s teams so my average went down, my stats went down, less All-Stars, less All-Defensive teams,” he said.