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Kyrie Irving, however, had the most unrestrained, emotional reaction to George’s leg snapping, an incident that no one in the arena could fully comprehend. Unable to watch, Irving buried his head in the chest of his father, Drederick, and began to cry uncontrollably. “I don’t think I really understood the magnitude of it, what transpired. I’m thinking, like, when is he going to be back?” Irving recalled this week as the U.S. men’s Olympic basketball team held training camp for the Rio Games. “In that moment, I don’t know the injury. I don’t know what happened. I knew it was pretty gruesome.”
Storyline: Paul George Injury
No such store existed. If George were going to return, he would have to work his way back. Which he has, after two years, a season-and-a-sliver with the Pacers and a whole lot of changes for him and his team. And this week, a media gauntlet reminding him constantly, in their grasp for perspective and an angle, of the shock, fear, pain, uncertainty and work it took to finally get back. “I’m telling reporters I’m done answering that one,” George said.
“We’re not forced to play for our country. We do it because we want to,” George said, “I think that’s the story that’s not being told. We want to represent our country, same way guys in the military, in the Navy, in the Army. They’re not forced to be in it. They do it because they want to defend their country. So it’s hard to say — injuries, death for what they do — it’s part of it, unfortunately.”