Chris Paul, who also serves as the NBPA president, considered taking a helicopter to attend, but couldn’t get out of a previous family commitment in Los Angeles, a source said. The NBA, USA Basketball and the NBPA collaborated to offer strong support as well. Five police officers manned the grounds at the gated venue. “I didn’t expect the commitment from the other athletes,” Anthony said. “I thought USA Basketball and the NBA could be on board. I was doing it myself at first. I was just going to come in and have a conversation. It wasn’t going to be this big gathering or NBA town hall. It was just going to be a conversation with a couple officers, a couple of youth.”
Voigt’s surprising career in professional basketball began with an internship with the Los Angeles Clippers. It stalled during the 1999 NBA lockout, so he worked for a data-warehousing company. It continued with the Clippers when the lockout ended—but he still kept the job with the data-warehousing company. Then he moved to San Antonio to be video coordinator for the Spurs. At the time, the Spurs’ front office was stocked with future coaches and general managers, and many of them had peculiar backgrounds. Voigt’s was the most unexpected of them all.