In “The Shawshank Redempton,” Andy Dufresne claimed that hope was a good thing — “maybe best of things” — but it seems to have backfired here. This was supposed to be a slam-dunk vote toward inching closer to an NBA arena. Instead, the Sonics faithful just got slammed. “The city’s past actions contributed to the Sonics leaving Seattle,” Seattle mayor Ed Murray said Monday. “Today’s council vote makes it less likely that the NBA will return.”
Storyline: Seattle Team?
B/R: Will Seattle ever get another franchise? If so, should the team be called the Sonics? NR: I hope it has a franchise again. It should be called the Sonics, for sure. Nothing should change. Keep the same colors—just swag the jerseys out. S–t, the main reason Seattle should have a team is because of the ballers it produced. Kevin Durant right now would tell you [that] if he had the chance to go to the Sonics or stay in OKC, he for sure would be in Seattle, and he wouldn’t want to leave ever. Myself, Isaiah Thomas—he has f–king offense—Jamal Crawford, we could build a Seattle team that would compete in the NBA, for sure. Brandon Roy, Marvin Williams, give us Zach LaVine, Avery Bradley, Aaron Brooks, Spencer Hawes, Jon Brockman, Rodney Stuckey…we’re taking all Seattle guys.
Storyline: Seattle Team?
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While both players are touched by the support, they also wish it was easier for people from their hometown to come to their games. They wish there was still an NBA team in Seattle. “When other players go to their home cities and are able to go to their favorite restaurants and take their teammates to where they’re from, I wish I could do that,” Bradley said. “I know Isaiah wishes he could do that. I would love to take everybody around, for them to be able to see where we’re from.”
“Yeah, that hurt,” Thomas said. “That hurt kids’ childhoods, man, not growing up with a professional basketball team like everyone else had. It’s tough now, and Portland is the closest team to them. I’m glad I was raised on Sonics basketball.” Bradley said basketball fans in the Seattle/Tacoma area have tried to maintain their allegiance to a team that no longer exists. They still consider themselves Sonics fans and still wear Sonics hats and shirts. “It was hard when they left,” Bradley said. “I don’t think I really understood it yet. It was kind of like, ‘OK the Sonics are leaving.’ After that first year of them being gone, I think it sunk in for a lot of people. Everybody was like, ‘Damn, man, the Sonics are gone.’ And everybody’s still pissed about it now.”
This came from a man with Gary Payton and Shawn Kemp on his Finals roster. For what it’s worth, the Sonics averaged 104.5 points per game that season but were held to an average of 89.2 throughout the six game slugfest. The final score of the Bulls’ Game 6 clincher was 87-75. “And Golden State I think is a good defensive basketball team, but their ability to explode is just … I think I’ve used the term videogame,” Karl said, citing Steph Curry’s remarkable three-point range as evidence.