HoopsHype Atlanta Hawks rumors

Roster | Salaries | On Twitter | Twitters | Instagram

Atlanta Hawks VIDEOS

March 13, 2015 Updates

The inability of the NBA and NBPA to agree on a strategy for incorporating TV money follows other signs of a fraying relationship between league and NBPA leaders. Roberts, for instance, has complained about players being artificially “deflated” by restrictions on salaries while various players have taken critical notice of the Los Angeles Clippers selling for $2 billion and the Atlanta Hawks likely to sell for over $800 million. The rise of Paul and James as NBPA leaders also invites concern that they will prioritize the financial interests of superstars over other players. The NBA, meanwhile, has independently-audited financial records to show a number of teams are losing money. Moreover, the league’s sound business strategy on television and international growth—not to mention NBA commissioner Adam Silver’s adroit handling of the Donald Sterling crisis—appear to have benefited players as much as owners. Despite these achievements, tensions between the NBA and NBPA seem to be rising. Sports Illustrated

March 12, 2015 Updates

The Macedonian is in the final season of the two-year contract he signed with the Hawks in 2013. The center left Europe for a rookie season in the NBA at the age of 31. Now, he’d like to stay beyond that original deal. “From your mouth to God’s ears, we say,” Antic said when asked if he would like to return to the Hawks. “I love it. I love the guys. I love everything. I couldn’t be happier to come. The coaching staff, to be so similar to Europe, to be so understanding of the players, rarely you can find that.” Atlanta Journal-Constitution

The feeling is mutual. When Hawks management plans for next season, nearly every scenario includes Antic. The versatility of the 6-foot-11, 265-pound center has played a key role in the Hawks’ system under head coach Mike Budenholzer. The coach raves about Antic’s ability to stretch the floor from the center position. Yet, he’d rather talk about his defense, basketball IQ and leadership. Atlanta Journal-Constitution

March 11, 2015 Updates
March 10, 2015 Updates

Shortly after sharpshooter Kyle Korver joined the Hawks 2½ years ago, he told Teague how he liked to receive passes when racing around pin-down screens. “He’d never been taught stuff like that,” Korver recalls. “It wasn’t his fault. It was how he’d been programmed.” Rather, it was how he’d been re-programmed. When Shawn watched the Hawks, he cringed, wondering where the kid from The SportZone had gone. “He hated how we played,” Teague says of his father. “He wasn’t even a Hawks fan. He was a Spurs fan.” Sports Illustrated

Budenholzer installed his version of the read-and-react offense, with hints of Popovich and Mike D’Antoni. “We’ve basically got two plays—strong and weak,” Teague explains. “That gets us into positions, but from there, we all have to make split-second decisions on what we do out of it: maybe a high pick-and-roll, or a dribble handoff, or Kyle coming around a screen. We look at the defense and just do what feels right. Other teams will call out, ‘Thumb four!’ and we know exactly what they’re going to do. No one knows what we’re going to do because we don’t even know ourselves. It’s like controlled pickup.” Sports Illustrated

The Hawks compare themselves to an expensive watch (“We’re all a gear,” says guard Kent Bazemore) and a deep-dish pizza (“We’re all a piece,” says Teague). When Teague took a charge this season, he hollered at Brand, “My first one ever!” And when he returned from a gimpy hamstring, he asked Budenholzer if he could come off the bench, “so I don’t mess us up.” A WWE devotee, Teague likens himself to Rey Mysterio, Korver to Shawn Michaels, Horford to Hulk Hogan, Millsap to The Undertaker. The team plays UNO or Spades together on the plane and adheres to breaking bread on the road, despite the limited menu options. “Coach takes us to these fancy Italian restaurants, with foie gras and escargot,” Brand laments. “We’re like, Hey, anybody got any french fries with ketchup over here?” Sports Illustrated

March 9, 2015 Updates
March 7, 2015 Updates

Korver, he of the businesslike attitude, also went Casual Friday. The sharpshooter has been mired in a slump for the better part of a month. Nobody is panicking, but easy dismissals like "regression to the mean" have been subsumed recently by legitimate concern. On Friday, he was 0-for-3 with two turnovers heading into the fourth quarter. "I've been off to a slow start every game since January," he said after a loooong sigh. "You do all these interviews about 50-50-90 [field goal, 3-point and free throw percentages] and you talk about shooting for a month. I don't know what it is." ESPN.com

"Tony Allen always told me, he said you can't stop guys in the league, but you can make it harder for them," Carroll said Friday morning in anticipation of LeBron. "[James] is the best player in the NBA right now. You know you just make it hard for him. Wear him out, get him tired. Mom always told me fatigue made a coward out of you, so hopefully I can get him tired and use my energy and be active." ESPN.com

March 6, 2015 Updates

His headiness as a player was all the more remarkable considering that he was stoned a large part of the time. “He was one of the few NBA players who could smoke marijuana and play the best 48 minutes you’ve ever seen,” said Danny Solomon, a former Hawks ballboy who is still one of Blaylock’s best friends. “And he was doing it for so long that it took a lot to have an effect.” Pot was one of his escapist pleasures, like the trout fishing vacations he took in Colorado or his golf habit. He first got in trouble for marijuana when he was suspended for the district championship game his senior year of high school. He was arrested for it twice during his career, including once in 1997, when he tried to take two ounces across the Canadian border as the Hawks boarded a flight from Vancouver after playing the Grizzlies. Smoking didn’t seem to diminish his focus; it takes an alert player to amass 2,075 career steals. Sports Illustrated

Athletes are famously fond of strip clubs, but Blaylock wasn’t an aggrandizing, make-it-rain type. Rather, he was a quiet afternoon regular who, according to Solomon, went by himself more often than not. “His thing was going to the strip club and looking at women all day. And I mean, all day,” Solomon said. The strip club was Blaylock’s safe place, where his status was validated, the parade of nude female bodies rendering verbose explanations unnecessary. At night, Crown Royal was his drink of choice—“If you had stock in Crown Royal, you’d have made a lot of money off him,” said Solomon—and his intake was extreme: a constant Crown on the rocks in his hand, plus seven to nine shots, according to Solomon. But he was mostly a calm drunk, the alcohol easing him into his own skin. “He’d get into his Crown and he’d have one or two women go downstairs with him. From time to time, there’d be a little extra money for some things. He’d get his regulars who he’d chit chat with, and of course the liquor brings the talking out, so it was perfect,” said Solomon. “I don’t know if you’d call it ‘partying,’ because he didn’t spend thousands. But he enjoyed getting out of the house. He enjoyed getting away.” Sports Illustrated

THE TOP 50 PLAYERS IN HAWKS HISTORY

While arguably the most popular, Dominique Wilkins is not the best player in franchise history.

   

Any rumor missing? E-mail us at   hoopshype@hoopshype.com.