HoopsHype Bill Laimbeer rumors

LATEST HOOPSHYPE VIDEOS

May 29, 2015 Updates

New York Liberty head coach Bill Laimbeer joined The Dan Patrick Show on Thursday morning, and he didn't mince words when the conversation inevitably drifted to the NBA's inescapable binary question: Jordan or LeBron? "There’s no question I would take LeBron James," Laimbeer said. "He can do more. Michael Jordan could score and make big shots and look spectacular at times with wild-flying dunks, but LeBron can get you 18 rebounds. LeBron can get you 15 assists if he chooses to, or he can score 50 if he wanted to. "So the triple threat he poses is just phenomenal, and then the size that he's got -- he just physically dominates. It’s impressive." ESPN.com

May 28, 2015 Updates

When pressed about how many championships Jordan won, Laimbeer didn’t back down. “Yeah, but look at what LeBron has in the Finals right now,” Laimbeer said. “Could anybody else in the world have led this team of role players to the finals right now? I don’t think so. Jordan could not have led this team to the finals. “LeBron came into the league knowing how to play basketball and involve his teammates. Jordan had to learn that, and they had to assemble some great teammates around him in order for him to win.” For The Win

May 18, 2015 Updates
May 8, 2015 Updates
January 9, 2015 Updates

Here's something you don't see every day: A head coach who didn't have his contract renewed ... but he's rehired the next season. That's what the WNBA's New York Liberty did with former Detroit Pistons center Bill Laimbeer. The team announced on Friday that it was rehiring Laimbeer as coach this season. He coached in 2013 and 2014 and was the team's general manager, though he won't hold the latter title this year. "I am proud to be leading the New York Liberty behind the bench, and believe that great things are ahead of us," Laimbeer said in a release. "I came to New York talking about building a championship culture — and remain committed to that goal as head coach. I am thrilled to get started on the upcoming season." Laimbeer's record as the Liberty head coach is 26-42. Newark Star-Ledger

October 26, 2014 Updates

And though Dumars isn't in charge now, Laimbeer says it's pretty much WNBA or bust as far as his coaching career is concerned. "I'm hunting right now," Laimbeer said. "I live in Florida full-time. In the winter-time, I'll be down there fishing and playing golf. But I enjoy coaching, and I'll probably try to get back in the WNBA down the road. "I think the NBA has passed me by. I'm 57. And it'd take a while to be a head coach and I'm not going to be a lifer assistant. If it doesn't happen, I'm going to be retired and hang out." Detroit Free Press

The Pistons move on with Stan Van Gundy as head coach and president of basketball operations, and Laimbeer is optimistic he will succeed in Detroit. "I think he's going to be successful. He's the coach and the head of the operations so the players can no longer go around the head coach as they have for the past 10-12 years in that franchise," Laimbeer told Foster. "That in itself is a positive. He brings a new fresh air of competitiveness. There's some rebuilding to do with the fan base, no question about that, but he's a grinder and he'll get through it." Detroit Free Press

April 17, 2014 Updates
April 2, 2014 Updates

So despite Laimbeer's success in the WNBA, where he currently serves as coach and general manager of the New York Liberty, Howe says don't expect him to land any NBA head coaching job. "A lot of people around the league remember," Howe said. "They don't like him. As a player, they didn't like some of the things he did. And he was kind of a rude guy to the media and other players. It took me two years to get to know him to even talk to me. That's the kind of guy he was. "But he was a force." Booth Newspapers

March 10, 2014 Updates

One of ESPN Films' most-anticipated 30 for 30 projects has an official airdate: The Bad Boys, which chronicles the dynastic Pistons teams of the late 1980s and early '90s, will debut Thursday, April 17, at 8 p.m. ET on ESPN. The film is a collaboration between ESPN Films and NBA Entertainment -- they partnered on the brilliant "Once Brothers" and the terrific "The Announcement" -- and Boys has the potential to be one of the better 30 for 30 efforts. (NBA Entertainment also produced the last year's sensational "Dream Team" documentary for NBA TV.) More than 40 people were interviewed for the film, including the Pistons' main principals (Isiah Thomas, Bill Lambier, Dennis Rodman, Joe Dumars, Adrian Dantley. Vinnie Johnson, John Salley, Mark Aguirre etc. ...) and rival Michael Jordan. Following the film, ESPN will air a one-hour discussion from 10-11 p.m. ET on the Bad Boys Pistons era. That show will be hosted by Bill Simmons and Jalen Rose, and ESPN NBA analyst Doug Collins will also appear along with several Pistons players from that era. I'll have more on the "The Bad Boys" in a standalone piece on SI.com on Monday. SI.com

February 18, 2014 Updates

Members of the 1989 NBA champion “Bad Boys” Pistons are reuniting next month to celebrate the 25th anniversary year of the first title in franchise history. Team members will first gather at “Bad Boys Unite,” a charity event, at the Westin Book Cadillac hotel in Detroit on March 27. The team will also be honored at halftime of the Pistons-Heat game the following night. Attendees have not been confirmed, but players on the 1989 team include Isiah Thomas, current Pistons president Joe Dumars, Bill Laimbeer, John Salley, Mark Aguirre, Dennis Rodman, Vinnie Johnson, James Edwards, Rick Mahorn, John Long, Fennis Dembo and Micheal Williams. Detroit News

November 7, 2013 Updates

Drummond stands 6-foot-10 and weighs 270 pounds. Pacers center Roy Hibbert is 7-2 and 290. They fought for position and bumped and bruised one another in an old-school exchange that would have made Bill Laimbeer proud. It was a wonderful inside battle that reminded you of the 1970s and 1980s in the NBA, when giant gladiators fought for position in the paint. There were some jabs during the game, but Hibbert saved the biggest one for after. “To tell you the truth I was a fan of his until tonight,” Hibbert said Tuesday. “He is a real good prospect, but it seemed like he was running his mouth a little bit tonight. He has a tremendous future, but I was a fan of his. I thought he was supposed to have a breakout year this year. Best of luck to him. He can dunk the ball real well and he can block shots and he can rebound. He is going to have a bright future — but I was a fan of his.” Detroit News

September 11, 2013 Updates

The NBA coaching fraternity is a little bit like the Supreme Court: It's really hard to get a spot on the bench, but even more difficult, practically impossible, to get kicked off. Once you're in, you're set for life. Although Rambis (now an assistant with the Lakers) was technically accountable for those two disastrous seasons in Minnesota, most NBA general managers I spoke with said he will likely, at some point, land another head job in the league, because he's seen as a good guy who just didn't have enough talent with the Timberwolves. When I mentioned Laimbeer, though, the reaction was visceral. He's lazy. He's a buffoon. He can't relate to NBA players. He treats them like it's college. Guys just won't play for him. ESPN.com

Before the 2010 NBA draft, many of the league's top decision-makers flew to Minnesota to watch a few prospects work out for the Timberwolves, who had a high pick. As one NBA general manager explains it, the purpose of these sessions is usually twofold: "The team is trying to impress the players as much as the players are trying to impress the team. And everyone with half a brain in the NBA understands this." Laimbeer was on the court that day, running the workout. He set up one drill, telling the players to outlet the ball to him with a crisp chest pass, then run the lane and finish on the other end. Pretty basic stuff. Once the drill started, though, the players occasionally forgot the whole "outlet the ball" part, and Laimbeer, as he is known to do, called them out in a sarcastic manner. The next time around, the players remembered to outlet the ball, but forgot about the chest pass. Laimbeer became visibly agitated by their inability to run the drill correctly. "By the end of the workout, we all thought there might be a fight on the court," one GM remembers. "Why make yourself the center of attention like that? For some executives, that day is all they know about him. And everyone left that gym with the same impression, that Laimbeer doesn't understand how the NBA works." ESPN.com

August 22, 2013 Updates

Any rumor missing? E-mail us at   hoopshype@hoopshype.com.