HoopsHype Carmelo Anthony rumors

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February 27, 2015 Updates
February 26, 2015 Updates

Kobe Bryant: But the facts are facts. The salary cap is the salary cap. Players aren't going to leave millions and millions of dollars on the table twice to come here and play. It's just not realistic. Wanting LeBron (James) to come here and take a massive pay cut again (last summer), after taking a big one to go to Miami, is not realistic. Melo (Carmelo Anthony) leaving $15-20 (million) on the table to come here is not realistic. So we have certain restrictions, but we'll figure it out. USA Today Sports

February 23, 2015 Updates

Carmelo Anthony played most of the season with a partial tear of the left patellar tendon, The Post has learned. In new details, the debridement part of Thursday’s surgery was to clean out the calcium deposits that formed within the partial tear, so the tear could be repaired. If Anthony had suffered a full tear of the patellar tendon — also known as a rupture — he could not have played on it this season. Ex-Knick Antonio McDyess suffered a full tear in 2000, as did the Giants’ Victor Cruz last season. New York Post

February 22, 2015 Updates
February 20, 2015 Updates
February 19, 2015 Updates

Billups, who now is an analyst for ESPN, doesn’t understand why the decision was up to Anthony on when to have season-ending knee surgery as well. “I said it all weekend, I wasn’t crazy about his decision to play in the All-Star Game and not play for his own team,” Billups said on “The Michael Kay Show” on ESPN New York 98.7 FM. “My thing is if you are hurt and you know you are going to shut it down, just get the surgery and make that commitment that the Knicks made to him and just get better and not worry about playing for the fans and the All-Star Game. I thought it was poor judgment but to each his own.” ESPN.com

“I enjoyed playing with Melo in the years I had with him,” Billups said. “My perception of him [is] he really needed my guidance, he needed my leadership. I don’t know that he quite knew how to lead a team or a franchise but at that time he was young. I can’t expect him to. He was already a great player but he is best served when he doesn’t have to be the leader of the team. ESPN.com

ESPN NBA analyst Jeff Van Gundy sure doesn't think Anthony has his priorities straight. And he feels the same about Knicks management, which apparently was OK with its franchise player suiting up for an exhibition game but not being healthy enough to help the NBA's worst team. Newark Star-Ledger

"I totally disagreed with this whole idea that the All-Star Game is so important that we should sit out regular-season games to get ready for the All-Star Game, and now with Anthony's decision to not only play in the All-Star Game but to end his season," Gundy said Thursday on ESPN Radio's Mike & Mike show. "I think it's backwards thinking from these organizations or players. It's got to be about the team, the team, the team. "The All-Star Game doesn't need any specific player. But these teams do need these maximum salary guys." Newark Star-Ledger

On Wednesday, Phil Jackson said Carmelo Anthony will likely need between four and six months’ recovery time from knee surgery, but a top New York sports medicine specialist familiar with this type of surgery said the time frame is more likely six to eight months. Dr. Lewis Maharam is not a surgeon and hasn’t examined Anthony, but he has overseen the care of patients who have gone through this type of procedure and “we can make educated guesses here.” New York Daily News

“What Phil is implying is they may know of additional problems and an additional procedure that would prolong rehab,’’ Hsu said. “Something more could be needed to be done like meniscus cartilage. The primary problem is the patellar tendon, but more procedures would prolong recovery, more time would be needed for full range of motion. They’re taking a camera inside the knee and doing work from the camera and they’ll see.’’ New York Post

February 18, 2015 Updates

NOT SO fast, Phil. On Wednesday, Phil Jackson said Carmelo Anthony will likely need between four and six months’ recovery time from knee surgery, but a top New York sports medicine specialist familiar with this type of surgery said the time frame is more likely six to eight months. Dr. Lewis Maharam is not a surgeon and hasn’t examined Anthony, but he has overseen the care of patients who have gone through this type of procedure and “we can make educated guesses here.” New York Daily News

“I would say (Anthony) has a minimum of six months before he’s at full strength,” Dr. Maharam told The News on Wednesday. “But I wouldn’t say it was more than eight. I don’t know the extent of the damage he has in there that needs to be scraped and refurbished. So if it’s heavily damaged with a lot of tendinosis, all over the place in there, little swollen globular knots within that tendon, it’s going to take longer than if he has one or two places.” New York Daily News

Despite the possible longer prognosis, Dr. Maharam expressed optimism that Anthony will return from surgery the same player he was before without any physical interruptions. “His career will be fine,” he said. “This is absolutely not a career-ending issue. I would say to Knicks fans: Don’t worry. He’ll be all right. He’s making a good decision to do it now so he can play next year when he gets some good players around him. It’s a good time for him to be hurt because he’s not going to get them to the championship this year. So get fixed and hopefully Jackson will bring in some people.” New York Daily News

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