HoopsHype China rumors

October 23, 2014 Updates

“During the offseason I didn’t think I’d sign in China. I thought I would get a good deal in the NBA, but I was overlooked,” Crawford told Basketball Insiders from his three-story mansion in Urumqi, the largest city in China’s western interior. Basketball Insiders

Q: Which NBA teams offered deals? Jordan Crawford: “Teams wanted to wait till training camp. There were talks of one-season veteran minimum deals. My history with the Washington Wizards concerned a lot of teams. I was traded to D.C. during my rookie season and I was very passionate about playing professional basketball. I worked very hard to show everyone from the coaches to the players to fans that I wanted to win and I could help our team win even when other players were injured or didn’t believe they could win. Some of the decisions that were made and how I expressed my frustration with those decisions led to a big misunderstanding in D.C. and I ended up with a bad reputation, but I’m working to change that.” Basketball Insiders

Q: Which NBA organization had serious interest in you? Jordan Crawford: “The Sacramento Kings wanted me, but I wasn’t comfortable accepting the backup role there. I’m a hard worker who loves the game and I felt I had something more to offer than what they were looking for from me at the time.” Basketball Insiders

October 22, 2014 Updates
October 21, 2014 Updates

The National Basketball Assn. is considering rescheduling some marquee basketball games in order to grow audiences in China. The possible move emerged as the organization unveiled a multi-year partnership with China’s Ministry of Education to develop sports educational in China. The education deal is expected to provide enhanced fitness and basketball training to at least 3 million school and college students by 2017. Variety.com

October 19, 2014 Updates
October 18, 2014 Updates

From the official release: “The groundbreaking partnership will focus on basketball participation in elementary, middle and high schools across China and aims to provide enhanced basketball training to at least 3 million students by 2017.” … “As part of the curriculum, NBA players, legends and coaches will visit Chinese schools to conduct basketball clinics and provide specialized instruction to Chinese coaches and physical education teachers. Chinese coaches and physical education teachers selected by the Ministry of Education will also have the chance to observe and participate in coaching activities organized by the NBA.” … NBCSports.com

In China, there is one bastion of American capitalism and culture that no one is shy about supporting: the N.B.A. The country’s insatiable appetite for American basketball was on display last week in Shanghai and Beijing, where the Nets played the Sacramento Kings in exhibition games. The Global Games — as N.B.A. teams’ games outside North America have come to be known — are greeted in China as the sports equivalent of the Academy Awards. It is the one time each year that fans can watch stars whom they have studied on CCTV-5 broadcasts play live. “The N.B.A. is just too thrilling,” said Wang Lianying, smoothing an “I ♥ NBA” sticker on her cheek as a Chinese master of ceremonies directed the crowd at the 18,000-seat MasterCard Center here to roar its approval for the Brooklynettes, the Nets’ dance team. “I was here last year and just had to come again.” New York Times

The N.B.A. is fortunate that basketball’s broad appeal transcends national lines. Even Xi Jinping, China’s president, is a fan — he took in a Los Angeles Lakers game in the United States in 2012. The league has been able to promote its brand through cooperation with the Chinese government at its highest levels. “It wasn’t that long ago when people spoke of Ping-Pong diplomacy, but I think we’ve now entered the era of basketball diplomacy,” said David Shoemaker, chief executive of N.B.A. China. The next night, crowds trying to escape the maw of the Beijing subway were subjected to a gantlet of scalpers. “Do you need tickets? How many? I’ve got a great deal,” said one man, who offered courtside seats with a face value of 3,200 renminbi for 2,000 renminbi (about $325) and whose cheapest nosebleed seats would still set a fan back 200 renminbi, a bit over $30. New York Times

October 17, 2014 Updates

The N.B.A. is fortunate that basketball’s broad appeal transcends national lines. Even Xi Jinping, China’s president, is a fan — he took in a Los Angeles Lakers game in the United States in 2012. The league has been able to promote its brand through cooperation with the Chinese government at its highest levels. “It wasn’t that long ago when people spoke of Ping-Pong diplomacy, but I think we’ve now entered the era of basketball diplomacy,” said David Shoemaker, chief executive of N.B.A. China. New York Times

October 16, 2014 Updates

More likely for now is that the NBA will allow advertising on team jerseys, said Silver, who was on his second visit to China since becoming commissioner in February. Ads on uniforms will boost the NBA’s global growth, he said. “It would cause a whole host of companies to become that much more invested in the NBA,” Silver said. “Just think about it -- if there was a Chinese company that was represented on an NBA jersey, and for the affinity of Chinese fans to see that familiar brand on an NBA team -- that’s going to help grow the game here.” Bloomberg

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