HoopsHype David Harrison rumors

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May 21, 2015 Updates

Charles made it clear that Harrison’s return is not about money stating, “[Harrison] would play for free. He’s back in love with he game and just wants an opportunity to play.” “At the end of the day, he’s a 7 foot center with a nice jump shot and dominating post moves. He’s a great guy who deserves a shot and his first shot unfairly taken from him. He’s looking at the NBA Summer League, D-League, and overseas,” continued Charles. Sports Agent Blog

May 14, 2015 Updates
May 12, 2015 Updates
March 13, 2015 Updates

Former Indiana Pacers center David Harrison, a little more than a decade removed from being a first-round pick in the NBA draft, has struggled to make a consistent living since his basketball career ended – to the point he said he took a job working at McDonald's two years ago. "I was embarrassed because of where I could be in life," Harrison told Yahoo Sports. "Everybody has to work and make a living somehow. I have two children. They don't care where I work. They just need to eat. "People were showing up trying to take my car. My house was in foreclosure. I didn't have any income. I just had everything going out. I have child support to one son. I have a really big family and I have to take care of them, even through I'm not playing in the NBA. I needed money." Yahoo! Sports

Harrison made $4.4 million before taxes during four seasons with Indiana and also played in China professionally for three seasons. He said almost all of that money is gone. Now 32 and without a college degree, Harrison said he's having a hard time finding a job. "An NBA career is a fragile thing," said Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle, who coached Harrison with the Pacers. "It tips on the slimmest of margins one way or the other. There are a lot of guys who get a taste of it. David had some pretty good years for us when I was there." Yahoo! Sports

Harrison said he smoked marijuana in the offseason during his first three seasons, but not during the season. Frustrated with his role under O'Brien and his lack of playing time, Harrison said he smoked weed daily – including before and after practices – during the 2007-08 season. He was suspended five games that season for violating the league's anti-drug policy because of his marijuana use. "It wasn't healthy," Harrison said. "I literally had to smoke pot every day so I would not hurt him. I would avoid him. I'd come in early and stay late. It wasn't like he hit me; he verbally abused me. But what coach doesn't?" Yahoo! Sports

O'Brien strongly disagreed with Harrison's characterization that he was abusive. "Let's just say he had a lot bottled up inside of him before we ever crossed paths," O'Brien said. "He was as good of an athlete as you were going to find at center, but he just could not get the job done. There was no way of beating around the bush. "I sat with him a lot. [Pacers president] Larry Bird sat with him a lot to see if there was anything to get him to utilize his talents. He just was not a very functional NBA player." Yahoo! Sports

Harrison said he is 16 credit hours from a college degree at Colorado, but can't afford to go back to school to finish. He has had a preliminary conversation with Colorado's men's basketball program about a graduate assistant opportunity, but nothing is brewing. When asked how he's making ends meet now, Harrison said: "I trade stocks. I invested in a few smaller companies that I've been able to liquidate out of. I've literally burned through about 95 percent of my savings. I applied for a job at Edward Jones. That didn't work out." Yahoo! Sports

November 19, 2014 Updates

In the years following the "Malice at the Palace," Indiana dismantled the core of its roster. Harrison alleges that Indiana's trade of Al Harrington and Stephen Jackson to Golden State was "racially motivated," particularly in the context of Pacers president Larry Bird's comments on white players in the NBA. Harrison, now 32, also recounts how his career spiraled downward as the Pacers franchise declined. "My dream became a waking nightmare," he writes. Sports Illustrated

David Harrison: I landed at LAX, rented a car, and began a drug binge that would have made Hunter S. Thompson proud. I was trying to die “Leaving Las Vegas” style, but some force had other plans for me. I blacked out in my room at the Mondrian Hotel in Hollywood and woke up in my apartment in Indianapolis. Apparently I tried to jump off my balcony but one of the people I was with (who shall remain nameless but thanks) saw I was completely out of control and called my agent. They found me the that night and got me home. He describes the 4-day rager in a way that makes me think the movie “Get Him to the Greek” should pay me royalties. Vigilant Sports

I didn’t see it then, but now I see it all from Nov. 19th 2004 (the night of the Brawl) until this bad relationship between me and the NBA ended I was fated to fail. I would say I was sorry but I would do it again so I attempted to explain myself. I wanted to say that I hated my life and constantly thought of ending it; I wanted to say Jim was trying to bully me; I wanted to just let it all out — my mom being checked into mental institution, my ex getting an abortion, my problems wanted to flow, but instead, I tried to intellectualize the situation. I wanted to try to have the public view me as a patriot for the millions of minor, non-violent, drug offenders who were serving minimum mandatory sentences, a voice for those who were afraid too of the system, but all I did was catch the ire of David J Stern and his lackey Billy Hunter. Vigilant Sports

January 2, 2014 Updates

But then I think about David Harrison. He's one of the greatest basketball players in University of Colorado history, 13th all time in scoring, ninth in rebounding. He was ahead of the curve too, outspoken about NBA players smoking pot, which he did primarily for pain relief due to a shoulder injury (and also because, well, pot makes people feel awesome). But he's now a 7-foot pariah. After serving a five-game suspension for pot use, and actually being league-mandated to go to rehab for pot, his NBA career flamed out. "They don't see me as a commodity. They kind of see me as a crazy person, I guess," said the 31-year-old Harrison, who's holding onto his fleeting NBA dream. " 'The Hunger Games' is pretty much an anecdote of being an athlete. Gladiators. You show disdain for the government or the rules, they're going to make an example out of you the best they can, to teach the thousands of people watching on TV the lesson they're trying to teach you." Denver Post

"With me and other athletes caught using drugs, you get labeled as a problem. 'He's crazy. He can't do this or that,' " Harrison said. "At the end of the day, I'm still going to be mad about the money I missed out on, but it's a changing thing, it's ever-changing, the law, and eventually we'll see how stupid it is to spend (millions of dollars) to put people in jail for smoking a plant. "At the end of the day, it's all about money (in sports), and who makes it. Marijuana isn't making the majority of these people money yet, and the second that they can, you'll see the restrictions come down. It's all about money. It's always about money." Denver Post

October 14, 2012 Updates
March 19, 2012 Updates

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