HoopsHype Greg Oden rumors

June 17, 2014 Updates
June 15, 2014 Updates

Miami will try to fight off elimination in the NBA Finals tonight with Ray Allen in the starting lineup and regular starting point guard Mario Chalmers on the bench. The Heat announced shortly before tipoff in San Antonio they will start LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, Rashard Lewis and Allen. They also deactivated Greg Oden and Justin Hamilton, meaning Michael Beasley will be available for the first time in this series. Palm Beach Post

Ethan J. Skolnick: Greg Oden will return to Columbus to work out this summer. He recently said that he was encouraged by some areas of progress this season. Twitter @EthanJSkolnick

June 11, 2014 Updates

This NBA Finals experience has been full of memories he says he’ll cherish for a lifetime. There’s no taking this joy away from him. This would qualify as part of the “up” times. He’s as healthy as he’s been in years thanks to the Heat medical staff and it has got him thinking he can realistically prolong his career. “Yeah, I’m sure I’m playing again next year but honestly I haven’t even gave it much thought,” Oden told CSNNW.com Wednesday after practice. “I’m trying to concentrate on this and getting this ring first and after that, that’s part of the thought process. My body feels good. I can still play. I’ll be alright.” CSNNW.com

June 3, 2014 Updates

Oden confessed that he has allowed himself the chance to daydream about what the moment with "the other trophy" would be like. Four more wins, and that dream becomes reality. "It'd mean we're the champions of the world, the best basketball team this year," Oden said. "That's what it's about, playing your best basketball when this time comes, who the best team is. I'm part of this team and that's what they brought me here for, to help get another ring. I'm just happy to be a part of it." USA Today Sports

May 31, 2014 Updates

Serena Williams and Caroline Wozniacki were both knocked out of the French Open in the early rounds, and instead of sticking around Roland Garros, the two players retreated to Miami to watch the Heat beat the Pacers in Game 6. After the game, Williams and Wozniacki celebrated with Greg Oden and Chris Bosh. For The Win

May 18, 2014 Updates
May 9, 2014 Updates

Given what Greg has been through physically, mentally, and emotionally since he entered the league, and because his default facial expression for as long as I’ve known him has been somewhere between “annoyed” and “depressed,” I’ve conditioned myself to expect him to look miserable every time I see him. Last week in Charlotte, the opposite was true. Having a positive attitude about your situation is vital to being a great benchwarmer, and Greg surprisingly had that covered. When I asked him if he was bummed that he wasn’t playing more, this was his response: “Are you kidding? I was a professional rehab/workout guy for four years. I wasn’t even a basketball player — just a guy who got paid to exercise. I spent four years trying to get back on an NBA court. Now that I’ve done that, it’s not fair to myself to complain about minutes. I knew coming into this that I wasn’t going to be the player I once was. I just wanted to get healthy and then help out any way I could.” Grantland

I asked him straight-up: “If this is the final chapter of the Greg Oden story — if you’re destined to be a benchwarmer for the rest of your career — are you OK with that? Will you be satisfied with your legacy?” “I’m over all of that,” Greg told me. “I know I’m one of the biggest busts in NBA history and I know that it’ll only get worse as Kevin Durant continues doing big things … It’s frustrating that my body can’t do what my mind wants it to do sometimes. But worrying or complaining about it isn’t going to fix anything … I wish the circumstances would let me play more, but I certainly don’t regret coming back, and I don’t regret signing with the Heat.” Grantland

May 8, 2014 Updates

When I asked him if he was bummed that he wasn’t playing more, this was his response: “Are you kidding? I was a professional rehab/workout guy for four years. I wasn’t even a basketball player — just a guy who got paid to exercise. I spent four years trying to get back on an NBA court. Now that I’ve done that, it’s not fair to myself to complain about minutes. I knew coming into this that I wasn’t going to be the player I once was. I just wanted to get healthy and then help out any way I could.” Grantland

I asked him straight-up: “If this is the final chapter of the Greg Oden story — if you’re destined to be a benchwarmer for the rest of your career — are you OK with that? Will you be satisfied with your legacy?” “I’m over all of that,” Greg told me. “I know I’m one of the biggest busts in NBA history and I know that it’ll only get worse as Kevin Durant continues doing big things … It’s frustrating that my body can’t do what my mind wants it to do sometimes. But worrying or complaining about it isn’t going to fix anything … I wish the circumstances would let me play more, but I certainly don’t regret coming back, and I don’t regret signing with the Heat.” Grantland

April 10, 2014 Updates
March 27, 2014 Updates

Long before I worked in the league, I wrote that I would take Kevin Durant over Greg Oden. Granted, this was a different situation since I wasn’t submitting an official report to a team, but the position still wasn’t a popular one among NBA people I knew. One GM I had a good relationship with at the time chuckled after he read my analysis and sort of patted me on the head like I was some kind of overzealous child while informing me that one should always bet on size. My response was simple: Sam Bowie. Basketball Insiders

The general idea of learning from mistakes has been captured in platitudes aplenty for centuries. However, most of us who exist in the public eye or have some kind of public platform rarely acknowledge our mistakes. There are likely numerous reasons for this. In the NBA, I noticed how quickly people would distance themselves from personnel moves that went awry and how equally quickly they would position themselves to take some kind of credit when the moves worked out. This can likely be chalked up to simple self-preservation. There are very few jobs in the NBA and many people who want them. Admitting mistakes in our culture is seen as a sign of weakness even despite all of the clichés to the contrary. Basketball Insiders

March 26, 2014 Updates
March 22, 2014 Updates
March 20, 2014 Updates

After all the surgeries, he missed three of the next four years, so you can understand why Walton has empathy for what the NBA has gone through lately, this season with Derrick Rose, Kobe Bryant, Rajon Rondo, Al Horford, etc., etc., all missing chunks of games with major injuries. Then there's Greg Oden, too often compared to Walton and not because they both were celebrated big men selected first overall by the Blazers. "I've been there," Walton said, quietly. "It hurts me to see that, to see them go through, to an extent, what I went through, to know these talented young men must deal with factors beyond their control, and also to see how it has affected a game that I love so much." SportsonEarth

February 23, 2014 Updates
February 18, 2014 Updates

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