HoopsHype Julius Erving rumors

February 28, 2014 Updates
January 29, 2014 Updates
January 25, 2014 Updates

Both Tanenbaum and Peddie, the president of MLSE at the time, assured their star he’d be kept in the loop on the hiring of the new GM, but all Carter heard were crickets, and it stung. Then, when Julius Erving reached out to Carter about joining the Raptors in some capacity, Carter made the introductions. But Peddie gave the NBA legend only a cursory interview at the airport, and published reports indicated Erving wasn’t really in the running. Peddie admitted he screwed that up: “I give myself low marks for keeping [Carter] informed, even by my own expectations,” he said at the time. SportsNet

January 6, 2014 Updates

Erving hasn’t returned to a television studio since, save for some promotional trips (like this one, with Stephen Colbert) centered on the release of his new memoir, "Dr J.: An Autobiography.” And while he isn’t exactly burning television network bridges with one recently released excerpt, you can probably understand why Mr. Erving doesn’t exactly seem keen on re-joining the broadcast booth any time soon. From his book: I worry that I am not up to the task of explaining the essence of basketball as it is played at the highest levels. I feel that it is like trying to explain music through words or to describe a painting through text. You can give a feeling of the work, or compare it to something else, but you can't re-create the actual feeling of being on the court, or making that move, of imposing your will, of the precise moment that you realize you can reach the front of the rim. Yahoo! Sports

November 8, 2013 Updates

Doctor J took the playground game indoors. Took it to a higher level. Above the rim. Flew like a condor, stung like a scorpion. Found wealth and fame in that thin air. It was different at ground level, both feet on the shifting terrain. All that gloom. All those people he loved, dying young. He has written his autobiography, with considerable help from Karl Taro Greenfeld. Calls it "Dr. J" when it could have easily been called "Julius Erving." Slice it and balance the parts, sadness outweighs joy 60-40. Philadelphia Inquirer

November 6, 2013 Updates

Last week, the likes of Julius Erving, Moses Malone, Charles Barkley, Allen Iverson, Billy Cunningham, Doug Collins, Bobby Jones, Pat Croce, Wali Jones and others converged in a back room of the Wells Fargo Center to pay tribute to Jeff Millman, a 50-year employee of the organization whose jobs varied from ballboy to equipment manager, but whose undeniable fingerprints on the club couldn't be given a title. The locker room was dedicated to him before the season opener against the Miami Heat, and he was introduced to the near sellout crowd in the first quarter, surrounded by the basketball royalty mentioned above. Millman was battling cancer, and all of those famous athletes whose lives he touched wanted to honor him. And, really, say goodbye. Philadelphia Inquirer

October 31, 2013 Updates

Jeff Millman touched many people's lives during a half-century of service to the 76ers. Many of the greatest names in franchise history returned to honor him Wednesday at the Wells Fargo Center against the Miami Heat. Among the former Sixers on hand were Julius Erving, Charles Barkley, Allen Iverson, Moses Malone, Billy Cunningham, Bobby Jones, Darryl Dawkins, and Doug Collins. In a pregame ceremony, the Sixers dedicated their locker room to Millman, a longtime equipment manager who had several jobs with the team over the years. They also honored him with a video tribute. Philadelphia Inquirer

October 30, 2013 Updates
June 11, 2013 Updates
June 10, 2013 Updates

And while he’s working as a special advisor to the Sixers and did some cameos on television in recent weeks to promote the documentary, including working with the “Inside the NBA” team on TNT for Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals, he said he has no interest in either working on a daily basis for a team or getting back into television full-time. “I’ll do cameos and appearances and things in the right situation, but it’s not a job I desire to have, and I don’t want to be on lockdown at this stage of my life,” he said. New York Post

But after the Nets have wrapped up a successful first season in New York since the team moved to New Jersey in 1977 when the franchise entered the NBA, Erving is glad to see the team on sound footing. “Well, the fact that it was four years in the making took away the element of surprise,” Erving said with a laugh during a phone interview with The Post last week ahead of the airing of the NBA TV documentary about him, “The Doctor,” Monday night on NBA TV. “We knew they were gonna end up in Brooklyn, but with the process, it was like when? It is surreal, but now that it’s done there’s no looking back, and its clearly the right move, in terms of developing their own market, and just the walk-in traffic alone in the building, the building is just a huge success story as far as things go. New York Post

June 8, 2013 Updates

None of what the NBA has become would have been possible, would've looked quite like it does, if not for the soaring talents, soothing voice and incomparable style of The Doctor. And so the timing couldn't be better for a remarkable documentary by that name, the story of Erving's life and impact airing Monday night on NBA TV. "All the basketball stuff, revisiting all that again wasn't burdensome," the great Erving told CBSSports.com. "But it was a challenge to remember and recall a lot of it because it's not something I'm constantly reminded of. You only see so many highlights. "When you play 1,200 games or more, you're not going to remember all the games -- nor do you want to, nor do you want to be stuck in that place between 1971 and 1987," Erving said. "I don't want to be stuck there. I don't mind going back to visit, but I don't want to run around wearing No. 6 and No. 32." CBSSports.com

"LeBron is such a gifted athlete, and he's way beyond the man-child aspect, the first impression," Erving said. "It's Herschel Walker, Bo Jackson and LeBron, OK? I mean these are guys when they were freshmen in high school, they probably could've been pros. I can only think of those three, and then George McGinnis was probably like that. Some get to the mountaintop and others don't. There's no guarantee. "Even though you're gifted with that type of body and you're a man-child, you still have to work at it -- work harder than anyone else, still have to develop your skills, still have to increase your IQ in terms of your sport. He's doing all that. ... He's on such a path right now that he could surpass Michael and he could surpass Kareem. Those are the guys I think are the NBA's best of all time. He's in that conversation, and he'll stay in that conversation." CBSSports.com

But Erving also appreciates that so many of the modern stars -- Bryant, James, Kevin Durant -- recognize and speak freely about the path that Erving and others paved for them. "I don't think LeBron is generous with praise of others," Erving said. "Certainly, those first five or six years he wasn't, and now he is in the later years. That's all part of his growth and development where he could appreciate what transpired before. "I'm certainly appreciative of anything he has to say that compliments me or other people who have made great contributions to the game of basketball," he said. "And that is a significant part of his evolution." CBSSports.com

June 6, 2013 Updates

Julius Erving said the Los Angeles Lakers traded the Philadelphia 76ers "damaged goods" in Andrew Bynum, called analytics "turning basketball into rocket science" and predicted the San Antonio Spurs would defeat the Miami Heat for the NBA championship while speaking Wednesday at Xfinity Live in the South Philadelphia Sports Complex. Erving spoke before a special premiere of The Doctor, a documentary produced by NBA TV on the life of the Hall of Famer and former 76ers great, who helped lead Philadelphia to a sweep of the Lakers in the 1983 NBA Finals, the organization's most recent title. He also helped the Sixers reach the finals in 1977, '80, and '82. USA Today Sports

June 5, 2013 Updates

Julius Erving, 63 said he can still dunk. He said that while he's primarily known as a 76er and is cognizant of and humbled by his legacy, today's NBA players are known more as mercenaries and that now basketball fans tend to follow players more than teams. He illustrated his point by saying that one of his sons' favorite players is LeBron James, while another son's favorite is Derrick Rose – and that if Rose joined the Sixers, his son would still like the point guard but wouldn't be a Sixers fan. USA Today Sports

Erving said he enjoys his role as a special consultant to the 76ers ownership group led by Joshua Harris, which is entering its third season and recently hired former Houston Rockets assistant general manager Sam Hinkie as president and GM. He said he believes the owners will turn the 76ers into a championship contender, but cautioned that it'll require a degree of shrewdness and common sense to make it happen, alluding to the team's ill-fated acquiring of Bynum, whose knee injuries prevented the center from playing a single game last season, as a major misstep. USA Today Sports

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