HoopsHype Kareem Rush rumors

December 26, 2013 Updates

If not for the knee injury, the 6-foot-6 Rush said he would "absolutely" still be in the NBA. But the time away from the court resulted in a search for a second career, which is when he poured himself into music as an R&B singer. "It was a blessing in disguise," he said. "You never want to be hurt, but I looked at it as an opportunity to learn more about myself and discover that I have other talents besides playing basketball." The Columbia Daily Tribune

Still, he thought he had plenty of basketball left. He said once he returns to playing shape, his shooting stroke should earn him a spot on an NBA roster. "Once I get my feet back under me," he said, "I definitely see a place for me in the NBA." That belief is reinforced by a pro game increasingly predicated on shooting and spreading the floor. "The most important thing offensively is your spacing," D-Fenders Coach Bob MacKinnon said. "When you can space the floor with shooters, people have to respect that. It creates a lot of other opportunities for players." The Columbia Daily Tribune

October 23, 2013 Updates
September 25, 2013 Updates
March 10, 2012 Updates

NBA veterans Antoine Wright and Stephen Graham both signed in the D-League on Friday, league sources told Ridiculous Upside. They join Kareem Rush, who joined on Thursday, as well as Ridiculous Upside favorite Jordan Eglseder as players who've recently signed in the D-League. Ridiculous Upside

March 9, 2012 Updates
December 12, 2011 Updates
December 9, 2011 Updates
November 15, 2011 Updates
May 3, 2011 Updates

Mizzou Athletics hosted its third annual ROARS event on Monday night, celebrating a year of success for the Tigers, on the playing field, in the classroom and throughout the Columbia community. Missouri also welcomed back former Mizzou great and NBA standout Kareem Rush. The Kansas City, Mo., native performed two songs off of his debut album, Rehabbing R&B. Rush will perform in Columbia on Tuesday evening at the Blue Note and current Missouri Basketball standout Laurence Bowers will help open for the former Tiger by singing two of his original songs. Bowers should go on around 9:30 p.m. University of Missouri Official Athletic Site

Kareem Rush looks as if he has stepped right out of a South Beach nightclub in his white seersucker suit and walks confidently into the Mizzou Arena hallway. He doesn’t care about the presence of other people surrounding him — he still needs to hit a few last falsetto notes to get the voice ready. “I loooove you till it hurtssssss!” Although it’s pretty jarring to see this lean and square-faced, 6-foot-6 man singing like a tender Brian McKnight, the young male arena security guard does not seem to flinch upon hearing the squeal. Rush then stops, takes a swig from his water bottle and thinks out loud. Now he’s using his deep voice again. “Where the public at?” Rush asks the female staffer just before his big Monday night debut in Columbia. She explains that the public was invited to his university-sponsored ROARS event, but the marketing plan to the Zou Crew fans probably did not pan out. “That’s (messed) up, Zou Crew,” Rush says. “I thought the Kareem Rush performance would bring them out.” Kansas City Star

On this night, he’s not just Kareem Rush, former Missouri basketball standout (1999-2000) who has played seven years in the NBA. He’s just an aspiring R&B singer hopeful to find his audience. “I may have been so branded with just basketball, so it’s hard for people to think that (I) may have a different talent,” the 30-year-old Rush says. “I love this as much as I love basketball. I can’t wait to see people’s faces when I really get myself out there and get my music out there.” The Kareem Rush that most people in this college town remember was the one who scored 1,584 points, 11th all time in program history, during his playing days inside the Hearnes Center. Now meet Kareem Rush, the dude who serenades while on a motorcycle at a Malibu beach in his “Hold You Down (Promises)” video. Kansas City Star

While in his seventh game with the Clippers, Rush suffered the most debilitating injury of his basketball career — a torn ACL that ended his season. This downtime gave Rush the time to pursue his other love. “I always knew I could sing, just never had the time to pursue it,” Rush says. “Once the injury happened, I was fully committed.” Rush began to lay down tracks inside his home studio and created his own label, Big Rush Entertainment. Last year, he performed for the first time, from the humble — a Mother’s Day gig in Jackson, Miss. — to the grand — an appearance on “The Mo’Nique Show,” a late-night talk show on BET. Rush has continued recording and for the first time, on Monday night he performed more than one song in front of an audience. While on stage, Rush sang over his backing tracks while sitting in a chair — a cue that he’s protecting his right knee for his day job. “I’m too big to be out there trying to do Chris Brown,” Rush said about his limited movement. “I try to keep it sexy.” Kansas City Star

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