HoopsHype Michael Jordan rumors

October 28, 2014 Updates

Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan says it’s his desire and intent to sign point guard Kemba Walker to a contract extension by the NBA’s Friday deadline. "I’d much rather get Kemba done before the season starts," Jordan told the Observer Tuesday. "Ultimately that’s what I intend to accomplish. We’re in real conversations. I’m hopeful. Really hopeful." Under terms of the NBA’s rookie pay scale, the Hornets can sign Walker to an extension by Oct. 31, thus avoiding him becoming a restricted free agent in July. Walker has said his preference is to remain a Hornet under a long-term deal. Charlotte Observer

Al Jefferson, an All-NBA center, can opt out of the final season on his deal this summer and become an unrestricted free agent. "You are always concerned – more so with Al because he’s totally unrestricted," Jordan said. "They are core pieces of what we’re trying to do…I’d like to keep both of those guys. I say I’d like to and I’d spend the money that’s appropriate. I’ll make every attempt to keep them." Jefferson was a breakthrough free-agent signing for this franchise in the summer of 2012. "Al is a straight shooter. We love him," Jordan said. "He took a gamble on us. That obviously plays into our thinking." Charlotte Observer

Charlotte Hornets: I’M BACK! …just kidding LOL. Trying out social media for the first time and sharing my day with you. Ready? #MJTakeover Twitter @hornets

“I’m always dreaming about that seventh ring," Jordan, who bought the team for $275 million in 2010, told ESPN.com. "And to get to that would be much more gratifying.” Sports Illustrated

Jordan said he didn’t want to change the team’s nickname back to the Hornets at first, saying he didn’t want to live in the past, but move forward. “That was my initial thinking and my staff came to me and said, "Let's do a survey and see what the people want. Once the opportunity came where we could get the name Hornets and when it came back overwhelmingly that they wanted the name back, this is when my decision was made," Jordan said. Sports Illustrated

October 22, 2014 Updates
October 16, 2014 Updates

Jordan also didn't see the point in shortening games by four minutes. He said the league informed its clubs of its intention to play a 44-minute game but that it was not presented as something the league is seriously considering instituting in the regular season. "I would never shorten the game by four minutes,'' Jordan said, "unless guys were having physical issues. It's not like football,'' he said. "We don't really have to worry about concussions and some of the physical damage that football players deal with after they retire. I can understand football players wanting to play fewer games from a physical standpoint. But basketball's not the same. I'm not diminishing the fact that we go through a grueling season. But I wouldn't want to shorten the game or play 15-20 fewer games.'' ESPN.com

October 14, 2014 Updates

After Stephenson and his agent, Alberto Ebanks, had failed to reach a deal with the Pacers, they met in Las Vegas with Jordan, Cho, Hornets vice chairman Curtis Polk, Clifford, Ewing and assistant general manager Chad Buchanan. Jordan wasn't the only member of his family at the meeting, either, as his brother and Hornets director of player personnel Larry Jordan was there, as was Hornets executive vice president of operations Ronnie Jordan. As Clifford remembers it, MJ and Ewing — the face of the Knicks during Stephenson's childhood — had everything to do with the three-year, $27million deal getting done a day later. "The biggest part about the meeting was our owner," Clifford says. "He's a fan of Lance. He loves his competitiveness, and he talked to him candidly about why we think he's such a good fit for our franchise and about things ... that (Stephenson) could control to get better. I thought that set the tone for the whole meeting." USA Today Sports

Clifford, who signed a three-year, $6million deal with a team option for 2015-16, raves about his experience with Jordan. "From the time I've been here, I think he's been motivated and aggressive to make our team better," Clifford tells USA TODAY Sports. "And then aside from that ... he's valuable to me because he watches every game. ... He gives me good feedback on what he sees, and he's not afraid to tell me when there are things that he thinks we could be doing better or I could be doing better. But he's also extremely supportive." USA Today Sports

October 12, 2014 Updates
October 9, 2014 Updates

Julius Erving, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan and David Stern are all names synonymous with the NBA’s rise in popularity during the 1980s. But there were, of course, key personnel in the league office building the foundation for success in the decades to come. Terry Lyons was one of those individuals. In fact, he filled some of the most important roles behind the scenes. ““Terry Lyons’ enormous contributions to our media relations efforts for almost three decades have been a key driver to our growth, domestically and internationally,” Stern was quoted as saying in a statement posted on Lyons’ website. ” He has grown up with the NBA and the NBA has grown up with him. Terry has traveled the world on behalf of the NBA and Team USA, spreading the basketball gospel. He has worked arduously to enhance international media coverage of our teams and our games and he has made the NBA office a welcoming center for the global basketball community and international media. We will miss him greatly, and wish him continued professional success and much personal happiness.” Ed Odeven Reporting

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